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January 31, 2018

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@hairshirt
Arizona's minimum wage is statewide (Flagstaff has its own, higher, minimum wage law). It phases in, reaching $12 in 2020. Colorado has a similar law. Along the Front Range, jobs that have always been considered "minimum wage" jobs are already paying more than the minimum -- 3.1% unemployment will do that. A fast-food place I was in last week was offering $12.50/hr for closing shift workers.

Of course, given the Front Range's recent rent history, it's not even close to a living wage.

Rural areas are a different story.

You heard it here first -- the defining market for autonomous cars will be small electric vehicles that carry Boomers with fading eyesight or physical problems from their paid-for suburban house to the doctor, grocery, etc.

It's always about the Boomers...

Average hourly earnings rose 0.3% over the prior month and 2.9% over the prior year. This year-on-year wage increase is the best since 2009.

Thank you Obama!

I'd give Janet Yellen a great deal of credit, too. Possibly the best Fed Chair you ever had.

Nigel and hairshirt, but especially Nigel, you guys seem very enthusiastic about self-driving cars...

It's not entirely enthusiasm; more that I regard them as inevitable, and likely to have consequences as profound as the adoption of the motor car last century.

I don't think it would be difficult to have cars in more-urbanized areas made to obey traffic signals...

this would be great. and it would be nice in rural areas, too.

there's an intersection on a four lane state highway near where i live - one we have to deal with if we go anywhere. and people constantly run through the beginning of red lights, at 65mph.

better yet, make traffic lights emit a signal of some kind that broadcasts their state. then make cars smart enough to be able to figure out what that signal means for them, and get ready to take over braking if necessary. easier than trying to react to lights with computer vision.

What I can see in the nearer term is cars with more and more self-management, if not being completely self-driving. That's already underway. I don't think it would be difficult to have cars in more-urbanized areas made to obey traffic signals, prevented from deviating too much from the speed of other traffic, avoiding rear-end collisions and such. Basically letting people drive, but preventing them from doing the particularly stupid things people do.

That would make all kinds of sense. But it will be interesting to see whether it arrives as the kind of incremental change that people don't notice. Or whether it is attempted at one step, producing the predictable reaction from those who see any such constrain as a horrid infringement on their libertarian philosophy.

The decoupling of restaurant industry labor from their tips:

https://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2018/02/say-goodbye-to-your-tips/

I'd give Janet Yellen a great deal of credit, too. Possibly the best Fed Chair you ever had.

I'd second that motion. It was a bit of an amazement that Trump nominated someone of similar views to be the next Fed Chairman. I was betting that he would put forward some total nut case, as with so many of his other economic positions. Whew!

Somewhat realistically, to make 'self driving' cars practical will require significant upgrades to the road infrastructure, so that the cars can figure out where they are supposed to drive (when there's snow/mud on the road, obscuring markings), when signals are going to change, etc.

There was a lot of road infrastructure to accommodate automobiles and human drivers, a hundred years ago. And, in the process, lost the "self-driving" feature of "climb in the buggy, say 'giddyup', and the horse knows the way home".

With catastrophic global warming, that may be in our future.

As soon as Jerome Powell and company invert the yield curve, mp will tweet him out of the Fed Chairman job, while insulting his relatives and his genetic lineage. We'll learn that Obama actually appointed Powell to sabotage growth.

Somewhere sapient remarked that she's afraid we are headed for nuclear confrontation, as I am. I guess that makes the Pentagon a nest of liberals, like the CIA and FBI:

https://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2018/02/nyt-pentagon-is-afraid-of-what-trump-might-do-on-north-korea/

http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/trumps-new-nuke-nuclear-plan-npr-raising-alarms-among-military-brass-war/

I have an unfinished post reserved from Sebastian's greatest fear thread weeks ago about MY greatest lifelong fear. I'll try to finish it and post it somewhere here before it comes true.

I'm trying to imagine the libertarian rental bidding process for the entire autonomous vehicle fleets in major metro areas when the sirens go off for the 45-minute warning that nukes are arcing for our cities.

Not that having ones own drivable vehicle will be of any help.

Better to leave now and hit the Cormac McCarthy road while the traffic is moderate.

Will autonomous rental vehicles in major Middle Eastern cities have the car-bomb option?

I can imagine suicide bombers around the world will be at the front of the line for the suicide-bomberless vehicles.

That is one segment of labor who is not afraid of losing their job.

hairshirt way above:

"If we're talking about self-driving ride-service, the cars could be equipped with interior cameras, which would be known up-front. That would discipline most people against being messy and/or sexy."

Say goodbye to Makeout Overlook. Teenagers' tips are confiscated and now this.

Although, a little bird told me that judging from
current porn conventions, having a camera in the car doesn't seem to discourage the sexy.

In fact, I'll bet Uber, given their front office reputation, sells the camera recordings to online porn merchants as part of their vertical integration and cross merchandising.

There will be small print waivers in the rental contracts.


The Memo! She is loose!

I'd give Janet Yellen a great deal of credit, too. Possibly the best Fed Chair you ever had.

Seconded.

You said you'd take a driverless bus.

Yep.

The presence of the driver is only one of many reasons that people don't change their kid's nappies on the bus.

Buses are not the be-all and end-all. And the fact that you have to share the same space with a bunch of potentially sketchy characters is one of the reasons most people say they don't like taking them.

Now, they will be able to share a much smaller space with a bunch of potentially sketchy characters, just serially, not all at once.

I have no doubt they are on their way, I have no doubt that many changes will be made to accommodate them. I'm just not seeing an upside that justifies the amount of money and effort that is being spent on them.

We're gonna still all be riding around in cars.

The biggest lift in all of this is going to be getting people to give up being the driver.

and yeah, people clean McDonald's toilets, but I don't think I want to spend an hour in one.

The Memo! She is loose!

Was it Director Comey in the Library with the candlestick (and a FISA warrant)?

THE MEMO.

h/t BJ

The Memo!

via Balloon Juice:

https://www.rawstory.com/2018/01/lawyer-drafted-nunes-memo-brutally-slapped-judge-order-ineptitude/

Conservative principles spreading thru the country like gastroenteritis thru a Calcutta Orange Julius stand.

Kash Patel is his name. We need immigration reform all right. With a blood test to keep out the foreign conservative asshole virus. I mean, we have more than enough of the home-grown kind.

We need emigration reform too. The kind where conservatives mper republicans are cuffed blindfolded, guided to the nearest seashore, and forced to swim for the nearest shithole with a gun barrel pressed against their necks.

One of the tradeoffs could be that trucks on the roads will become smaller, traveling slower. Without drivers; except for refueling/recharging, maintenance, loading/unloading; they can operate 24 hours a day.

Without drivers; except for refueling/recharging, maintenance, loading/unloading; they can operate 24 hours a day.

In his Brooklyn youth, my late step-father split a cab with a buddy of his in NYC. He drove 12, his buddy drove 12. The cab ran 24/7.

Gas it up at the beginning of the shift. Periodically have it lubed and washed while you eat lunch.

FWIW.

Re the Count at 12:10:

Given the cost of spreading lots of small nukes around the world, well now we know why the crazies want a big increase in the military budget. And it isn't the kind of increase in military readiness that the actual, you know, military thinks is needed.

For some thoughts on the Machine Learning aspect of driverless cars, see this from the Economist's Intelligence Unit (starting on page 24):
http://eiuperspectives.economist.com/sites/default/files/Risk_and_rewards.pdf

NB: the research was sponsored by Google. How much influence that had depends on your personal views. But in my observation, the Economist folks are pretty good about keeping sponsorships from bending their analysis all that much.

Autonomy and monopoly at the same time:

https://www.popsci.com/self-driving-car-fleets#page-2

via Eschaton

better yet, make traffic lights emit a signal of some kind that broadcasts their state. then make cars smart enough to be able to figure out what that signal means for them, and get ready to take over braking if necessary. easier than trying to react to lights with computer vision.

That’s actually what I had in mind. Once all the cars were equipped to receive direct traffic-signal inputs of whatever sort, the lights would be for show, if they remained at all, sort of like the noise purposely introduced on VoIP phones so people won’t think the line went dead when no one is saying anything.

Autonomy and monopoly at the same time

Looks like, after bankrupting the taxi companies, they want their own time in the regulatory sun.

thermonuclear weapons don't kill people, people kill people

Regarding self-driving cars, I start from the position that cars should all be junked, but that's just me, luddite. So I'd go along with (yes, once again) what russell said, or Atrios. Here's another voice crying in the wilderness.

Ya' know, reading some of the comments on this thread reminds me of the time I wasted back in the 90's reading George Gilder broadsides.

Have they locked him up yet?

....and I am STILL WAITING for my flying car.

Long overdue, don'tcha' think?

When the hell is smellivision going to replace television?

better yet, make traffic lights emit a signal of some kind that broadcasts their state

Like I said:

We'll have self-driving cars right after we all pay to rebuild all of the infrastructure that currently doesn't support self-driving cars all that well.

As a rough order of magnitude, there's about one signalized intersection per 1,000 people. So, something like 300K signal beacons to procure, install, and maintain.

If we're gonna go to all that trouble, just embed some kind of tractor beam in the roadbeds.

"tractor beam" sounds more expensive than a low-power radio beacon.

You already have smellovision!

You just have to douse your TV with a soft-drink, to let out the Magic Smoke™

better yet, make traffic lights emit a signal of some kind that broadcasts their state

Better yet....eliminate traffic signals. Traffic would be governed by self regulating algorithms and micro price adjustments negotiated by robot traders in nanoseconds. The oppressive state apparatus would be eliminated. Think of getting into your vehicle in the morning having already made a killing in traffic futures or time to work put options. Uber/Lyft profits would be traded away, as all traffic is transformed into shimmering electrical field virtual probabilities.

Better yet: FLYING CARS! Eliminate the need for roads all together.

There's a theory that roads without traffic signals at intersections would be safer

"tractor beam" sounds more expensive than a low-power radio beacon.

I say go for the gold.

What I'd really like to see is an in-car device that gracefully pulls the car over to the side of the road and turns it off if it detects that the driver is texting.

Better yet: FLYING CARS!

Vahana single passenger autonomous aircraft takes first flight

What I'd really like to see is an in-car device that gracefully pulls the car over to the side of the road and turns it off if it detects that the driver is texting.

Amen to that.

Not to weaken the punch, but how about people who drive with dogs in their laps?

This could get to be quite a long list.

Nice try, CharlesWT, but no dice.

Ya' know, reading some of the comments on this thread reminds me of the time I wasted back in the 90's reading George Gilder broadsides.... Have they locked him up yet?

I always wondered how someone could be as spectacularly wrong about various things as George was, and yet people kept asking for his opinions.

The only time I ever drove in England was in 1997, when I rented a car and traveled...here and there, but never inside London. (Among other reasons, there were IRA bomb threats at that time, and in fact an IRA bomb threat interfered with my arrival, but that's a separate story.)

The friends I was visiting gave me detailed instructions and warnings about how to negotiate roundabouts by their rules, and I barely saw a traffic light in the couple of weeks I was there.

Now there's this.

This could get to be quite a long list.

I’m sick of people slicing pastrami while they’re driving. Makes me crazy!

When are they going to make a good self-slicing pastrami?

Speaking of brined meats, what about this poor excuse for an over-the-counter lunchmeat:

https://republicinsanity.tumblr.com/post/114038369768/paul-gosar

Here he goes again, a week after demanding Dreamers be arrested during in situ at the SOTU.

https://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/paul-gosar-nunes-memo-treason

He's ANOTHER dentist. Are we keeping track of the clinically insane dentists holding public office in this country?

A Tea Party fuck.

This could get to be quite a long list.

Woman causes crash shaving bikini area while driving

mp will nominate that woman tomorrow to head up the National Transportation Safety Board because he thought the article said she was providing a "public" service.

That was a prickly situation.

Right on the razor's edge.

what about this poor excuse for an over-the-counter lunchmeat

Were I a (R) holding national office, I would not be in a hurry to get behind the Nunes memo. Even Nunes seems to be holding it at arm's length.

But, I'm not a (R) holding national office.

Please proceed, (R)'s.

https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2018/2/2/1738345/-Former-Hippies-Put-in-Horrible-Position-of-Rooting-for-F-B-I-Andy-Borowitz

In serious countries, during and after the coup, the Hannitys of the world, gathered round the deposed figure in his lair, are flushed out, rounded up and never seen again:

https://www.mediamatters.org/video/2018/02/02/hannity-fbis-russia-investigation-attempt-coup-and-attempt-unseat-elected-president/219264

Lucky for Hannity that he lives (he has a funny sort of immigrant name, so I'm not sure about the born-in part) in the fake reality show called America The Full Of Shit, where the deserving never receive the ultimate punishment.

He'd look good on Russian TV, given the anti-American cut of his jib. Defection, Sean. Do it, ya punk.

But you can see that he is priming the base for violent reaction. There are many more acts left in the bloody conservative passion play.

As long as the Republican Party lives, in or out of power, the Republic is in grave danger.

One can only hope.

"Woman causes crash shaving bikini area while driving"

Even self-driving cars can't save us from Florida Woman (or Man). They will rise to the occasion.

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/02/02/jeremy-siegel-says-investors-got-too-bullish-and-now-paying-price-we-overdid-it.html?__source=yahoo%7Cfinance%7Cheadline%7Cheadline%7Cstory&par=yahoo&doc=104986175&yptr=yahoo

Figures. OMG, wages are rising.

It's like when portabella mushrooms finally made the menu at McDonald's. That fad is over.

Within three years, we'll be back to republicans telling laid off wage earners to get a fucking job, you leaches. This is what happens when people making nine dollars an hour try to extract, like any decent capitalist, too much inflation out of Paul Ryan.

we're going to see the 10-year probably go to 3 [percent],'" Siegel said

cats and dogs, living together

Others have attributed Amazon, et al jumping into healthcare for causing the selloff.

Nah, it's the backup in interest rates, plus the market became untethered from its fundamental and technical underpinnings and needs some time to revert to the mean.

The 35-year bull market in bonds that began post Volcker in 1982 is over. That's a sea change.

Oil stocks got killed today too.

Lotta fake news between the top last week and reality.

Doesn't mean the bull market in stocks is over.

Also, the weekends are now way too suspenseful. Do we embark on the most colossal of constitutional crises or a nuclear strike on North Korea?

Or both for the jackpot. I say they are two peas in the pod. We are in the death grip of pure conservative nationalistic Evil across the globe.

https://talkingpointsmemo.com/edblog/very-very-bad

Doubt your nightmares. Go ahead. Mine know what's coming.

Do we embark on the most colossal of constitutional crises or a nuclear strike on North Korea?

At a guess, we save making a strike on North Korea until it's useful for distracting from a constitutional crisis. Or a Presidential indictment. Wouldn't want to play his hole card too early.

https://www.marketwatch.com/video/sectorwatch/how-self-driving-cars-will-learn-to-make-life-or-death-decisions/CCF45FDE-0D8B-49AA-96CA-330324DAB7FF.html

https://www.marketwatch.com/video/the-robot-revolution-the-new-age-of-manufacturing-moving-upstream/0C3B7686-7D97-4BCE-980B-FAED24F27672.html

Countme-a-Demon, thanks for the links.

i;m not sure you can solve the trolley problem by "not allowing the car to create an accident". the trolley in trolley problem hasn't created the situation it's in; that happened off-camera. the trolley is simply in the situation, and it has two bad choices.

I have a different take on the income inequality topic. It seems to me that back in the good old days of my youth (the sixties and seventies) that many things were affordable which are not affordable now and many things were more avialble than they are not and I think the reason is that federal ans state money was spent on things that are not funded now or are not funded at a level comparable to the good old days. I dont know if anyone has done any studies of this or not.

TO give an example: My dad was a college professor. My mother never had to get a paying job. Three kids went through college with no debt. My parents with no particular stress or strain accumulated a very comfortable retirement which included buying waterfront property on the Puget Sound. We were at the lower end of the income range in my home town of Ames Iowa and as far as I could tell the janitor who lived across the street from us had a lifestyle that was not in any visible way different than ours.

What happened?

The county were I live now just lost our animal control officer due to budget cuts. The bus service is limied and expensive for those who use it--that beig the poor who cannot afford to maintain a car. There is a homelss camp on the river in the National forest. The plywood mill was sold and the new management is non union and employees fewer people art lower pay. The down town is nearly dead. There are lots and lots of expensive houses with water views but the najority of residents live in conditions that are Appalacian. many things cost more than it sued to: car licenses, art entry fees--because state revenues are not what they used to be. Many things that used to be funded with fedral money are now funded with limite state money or passed on to be funded by even moe limmited county budgsts.

Ever sense the Reagan years the federal moneys coming into the state have been reduced and at the state level rightwing re venue reductions hve happened ( estate tax eliminated).

What I am suggesting here is that there might be a correlation between tax investment in society and the ability for people to maintain a middle class lifestyle. Is this an issue? If so what will be the long term impact on income inequality of the new deicet created by the tax cuts for the rich law the party of oligarchy just passed?

what wonkie said

I see stuff like this and I just don't know what to say about it.

If you don't feel like clicking through, Nunes announced on Fox that he hadn't actually read the FISA applications that his memo claims are political hatchet jobs.

"These FISA warrants are based on Democratic-funded oppo research and circular reporting!"

"Did you read them?"

"No"

?!?!?!?!?!!??!!?!

It's like the "fake news" thing with Hoekstra and the Dutch reporter.

Maybe they are trying to break our minds with the sheer bald-facedness of their bullshit. Who knows, it might work.

It's hilarious in it's own way, but it's also toxic, because it defeats any attempt at rational dialog or engagement.

Up is down.
No it's not.
Yes, it is.
Are you seriously trying to tell me that up is down?
I never said that.
You said it one minute ago.
No I didn't.

Russell, consider this
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/posteverything/wp/2018/02/02/devin-nunes-is-acting-like-a-partisan-hack-thats-p-much-how-i-remember-him/
Bear in mind that the author isn't some flaming liberal. In fact, he's a tea-party Republican. When he says "partisan hack", it's serious.

wonkie,

What happened? The usual. The rich got their lickspittle to reduce their taxes...not once, but several times. This financial edge then compounded over three quarters of a century. Because too many folks were fat and happy, any and all countervailing social institutions or arrangements were undermined via pure political aggression or social neglect.

So here we are.

One has to understand that when you give the rich an edge, they will never be satisfied. There is never enough. You give them more, they will respond by only demanding more.

Blow it up.

It seems to me that back in the good old days of my youth (the sixties and seventies) that many things were affordable which are not affordable now and many things were more avialble than they are not and I think the reason is that federal ans state money was spent on things that are not funded now or are not funded at a level comparable to the good old days.

I say this regularly: compare a late 1960s state budget and a contemporary state budget and the change jumps out. Today, on the order of two-thirds of the state's general fund spending is Medicaid and K-12 education. Both started showing up in the late 1960s. Medicaid because the states adopted it, and K-12 spending in the form of "equalization" funds. The latter recognized that poor districts (rural and some urban core) couldn't levy high enough property taxes to fund contemporary public school programs. In my state, the poorest districts get ~80% of their budget from the state, but all the districts are dependent on that state money.

The politics of the Big Six general fund spending categories are such that higher ed and transportation take the lion's share of the cuts when the budget is tight.

I see stuff like this and I just don't know what to say about it.

if you have the stomach for it, go take a look a Breitbart's front page.

they're selling the Nunes memo as if it proves every harebrained conspiracy that the right was able to dream up over the last 10 years. and the audience believes every word of it.

IMO, the whole memo is just fan service. the GOP is keeping the rubies riled because they need the whole team, rube to representative, on board when Trump gets round to really interfering in the Mueller investigation.

David Dayen on wages, the Dow, and tangentially "how stuff used to be".

My household income includes, at this point, a significant amount of return on equity investment. I'm only a few years from
retirement and, by far, the bulk of my retirement income is going to come from the same source.

Describing a 2% drop in the Dow as "tumbling" seems, to me, more than overwrought. If a modest decline in the value of my retirement nest egg is the price for people getting paid enough to live on, I'm fine with it. My wife and I will muddle through somehow. Lucky us, we have enough that it's something that even affects us, assuming it does.

The focus on the Dow and other financial markets as the be-all-end-all measure of "how the economy is doing" is just nuts.

It's about time some of the great heaping piles of money the US economy generates is making its way to the people who do the work. May that trend continue and accelerate.

The focus on the Dow and other financial markets as the be-all-end-all measure of "how the economy is doing" is just nuts.

Too true. Mutch of the stock price run-up could be due to stocks being the current target of cheap money.

...Mutch...

Guess my cap is too tight...

IIRC there was a French guy that wrote a big book about the wage/capital issues of the OP. Pritky? Prissy? Something like that.

Might be worth a read.

Thomas Piketty

Some of his data and conclusions have encountered some pretty heavy criticism in various venues.

K-12 spending in the form of "equalization" funds. The latter recognized that poor districts (rural and some urban core) couldn't levy high enough property taxes to fund contemporary public school programs.

Or, in the case of California, because someone convinced the voters (in the 1960s) to place severe limits statewide on property taxes. So even a relatively wealthy school district couldn't vote to tax itself sufficiently to fund schools.

....due to stocks being the current target of cheap money.

Or that corporations are awash in funds they can find no lucrative investment outlet for, and they spend it buying back shares. The problem is too much of that "cheap money" is in the hands of a few.

Or, in the case of California, because someone convinced the voters (in the 1960s) to place severe limits statewide on property taxes.

Colorado as well. Politicians and voters at that time, in all sorts of places, decided that they weren't going to push the elderly on fixed incomes out of their paid-for suburban housing into rental housing that they would also be priced out of eventually.

If we're in a "blame the Boomers" mood, yeah, it was the Boomers deciding that their parents ought to be able to keep their houses.

If they had limited the freeze on property taxes to those who had retired, that would have been a different story. But by applying it to everybody, what they did (besides starving schools, of course) was massively reduce mobility -- because people couldn't afford to move, which would result in an abrupt property tax increase.

Of course, while Prop 13 was SOLD as being about pushing the elderly out of their homes, that wasn't the real motivation. It was actually just an early manifestation of the "starve the beast" approach to crippling any and all government.

Oh yes, and it wasn't Boomers that pushed it thru. We just weren't that big a segment of the voting population at that point. (I routinely voted even then. But I was very much the exception.)

If we're in a "blame the Boomers" mood

no worries, we'll all be gone soon

no worries, we'll all be gone soon

Speak for yourself. I have gone out of my way to set my children up, far more than my parents were able to do for me. I fully intend to live long enough to be a burden :^)

well done.

my step-son is a musician. my wife and i are on our own.

OT-ish, but let's face it, all ObWi threads are open threads.

from the annals of fiscal responsibility.

the new tax regime was reflected in my most recent paycheck. looks like i'm on track to take home about another $3500 this year.

i don't want it.

the (R)'s are coming for the entitlements. it won't be front and center this year, because mid-terms. if they hold a majority in either or both houses of congress, it will be front and center next year.

the national debt will be the lever.

Paul Ryan will lead the charge. other than summer jobs and a stint as "marketing consultant" for the family business, his entire career has been in politics and/or government. his college education was paid for in part with SS survivor benefits.

but he feels we all need the goad of potential dire poverty to help us to be our best selves. ayn rand and milton friedman told him so.

i don't want it.

I can post my PayPal link...

Here is a view of the lack of growth of real wages (of "production workers", from the BLS) which I have been showing for years. There is no need to get into derivative measures, even productivity, to show how wages have not kept up with production since around 1973, and how economic growth has been going almost entirely to upper incomes.

http://www.skeptometrics.org/BLSB8.PNG

One of the ways that workers should be benefiting from increasing productivity - which actually equates to automation - is through reduced hours. The standard work week of 40 hours has decreased only slightly since 1937. This is not a good thing. Overall hours worked should be decreasing, not increasing - why should everyone be slaving away to produce stuff we don't have time to take advantage of?

The standard work week of 40 hours has decreased only slightly since 1937

LOL.

I don't think I've worked a 40 hour week in 20 years.

Meanwhile, self-driving cars again.

And today, a coalition of companies—including Lyft, Uber, and Zipcar—officially announced that they were signing on to a 10-point set of “shared mobility principles for livable cities” .... the final one speaks loudly about what city roads of the future could look like: “that autonomous vehicles (AVs) in dense urban areas should be operated only in shared fleets.

Watch your wallets, America.

Howard Jarvis was born in 1903.

Ronald Reagan in 1911.

Arthur Laffer is 77 years old, not a baby boomer.

Their noxious spawn:

https://www.balloon-juice.com/2018/02/03/repub-venality-open-thread-paul-ryan-is-not-a-serious-person/

Yes, he is. He is this kind of serious:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74BzSTQCl_c

Grover Norquist is a baby boomer. The baby is not safe around him.

The conservative movement is a multi-generational killer.

Watch your wallets, America.

After bankrupting the taxi companies, they just want their turn in the regulatory sun.

Watch your wallets, America.

This.

Dad: You'll eat your peas and you'll like 'em.
Spanky: I'll eat 'em, but I won't like 'em.

We're about to have self-driving cars whether we like 'em or not. It's not up to us, it's up to the people who are going to rake their profits out of our wallets, directly or via the taxes we'll pay to redesign the entire infrastructure of our landscape for their purposes, just like we did for automobiles in the first place.

I keep imagining dedicated lanes for AVs of whatever kind in and around Boston....what a hoot. Where are they going to put 'em...across the rooftops?

a legal monopoly is every capitalist's dream.

Ryan is now referring to the act of taking away medical care for the poor in America as "fulfillment".

He is one sick fuck. The Deepak Chopra of down-punching sadism. The Maharishi of monstrous malevolence.

And cheerfully so.

By fulfillment, Ryan means the
feeling he experienced when he very personally got the pages of "Atlas Shrugged" stuck together, his copy paid for with SS survivor benefits.

That book has centerfolds only visible to pigfuckers.

He can no longer even open the pages of Rand's "The Virtues of Selfishness".

He smiles when he helps you down the stairs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3oesSyvh76g

Where are they going to put 'em...across the rooftops?

They'll rebuild the central artery.

https://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2018/02/in-shocker-deficit-explodes-yet-again-under-republican-rule/

They'll rebuild the central artery.

They can call it "The Even Bigger Dig."

I so hope this happens:

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/01/30/trump-reportedly-talking-about-having-sessions-prosecute-mueller.html?recirc=taboolainternal

America is coming to a savagely violent end.

He also pocketed the weekly buck fifty for himself:

https://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/ryan-celebrates-school-secretarys-1-50-a-week-pay-raise-from-tax-bill

“Ryan is now referring to the act of taking away medical care for the poor in America as "fulfillment".”

Ryan and McConnell and McCain in his warmongering moments are in different ways the creepiest people in politics. Trump is unique in his own bad way, but he seems so mentally off that if he weren’t the most powerful man on the planet I would feel sorry for him. I think of him as a puppet, not of Putin ( his foreign policy would be less neocon if Putin controlled him), but of whoever is the latest person to feed his narcissism. Ryan and company are just nasty ideologues.

“The Deepak Chopra of down-punching sadism. The Maharishi of monstrous malevolence.

And cheerfully so.”

Love it

Just in time for this thread:

http://www.lawyersgunsmoneyblog.com/2018/02/political-history-future-autonomous-annalee-newitz

Ryan and company are just nasty ideologues.

The ideology itself is profoundly nasty. IMO.

Maybe it attracts people who are already nasty, maybe it makes otherwise reasonable people nasty via some kind of mental osmosis. Maybe both.

Either way, if your view of the world and other people is based on radical selfishness, it's not gonna go anywhere good.

IMVHO.

Most folks who dabble in it grow out of it. Some don't.

I keep imagining dedicated lanes for AVs of whatever kind in and around Boston....what a hoot. Where are they going to put 'em...across the rooftops?

Around here, they just take away one of the existing freeway lanes when they want to add a toll** (or, previously, HOV) lane. This also makes traffic on all the other lanes much worse. Thus, it is hoped, encouraging car pooling. A similar approach ought to work for AV lanes.

** For those on the East Coast, where toll roads are common, I should perhaps note that they are a novelty in the West. Here, we tend to the theory that, if a road is build using tax dollars, it shouldn't charge for use. We also get better traffic flow from not repeatedly slowing down for toll plazas. (Don't have to carry piles of change on the car either..

wj, you don't have to carry piles of change now. I had the distinct pleasure of driving from ATL to CHI just before Christmas. There's a stretch of toll roads right around Indianapolis (if I'm remembering correctly) where you don't stop to pay at a toll booth; in fact there aren't any toll booths. Presumably local drivers pre-pay the tolls, and if you aren't a local driver you get a bill in the mail about a month after you've driven through there. The bill had a snapshot of my car tag printed right on it.

By the way, there was no practical route through that area that didn't involve driving on a toll road.

She mourns cheerfully at the Republican family cemetery plot. There is still room for her, and the rest of them. Silver stakes thru their blood pumping apparatus and salt packing their mouths for the lot of them.

https://digbysblog.blogspot.com/2018/02/not-your-grandfathers-mccarthyism.html

Around here, they just take away one of the existing freeway lanes when they want to add a toll** (or, previously, HOV) lane. This also makes traffic on all the other lanes much worse. Thus, it is hoped, encouraging car pooling. A similar approach ought to work for AV lanes.

Since this is a response to my snark about Boston, I have to ask: wj, have you ever actually driven in Boston? Or even seen it?

Echoing chmatl: The Mass. Pike removed toll booths a year or so ago. If you don't have E-ZPass, they mail you a bill. Ditto some of the bridges around Boston (maybe all the toll ones; I don't drive down there if I can help it, so it's been a while). I-95 north through NH and into Maine has lanes where you can just keep driving if you have EZPass. No piles of change required.

More on financial markets:

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/bond-markets-debt-ceiling-alarm-050100275.html

NC has a single toll road, which i take every day. it's all electronic tolls - no booths anywhere. and it works with EZ Pass and transponders from SC, GA, and FL.

the deal was : we'll build it now but it will have to be a toll road. or, you can wait a decade or so while we save up enough money.

Yes, I have driven in Boston. (Although I confess it was quite some time ago.) Also drove from thete down to DC and back. Obviously the experience made an impression. 🤔

Glad to here that the toll roads have move past change piles.

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