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August 22, 2008

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Woo hoo! We've suffered enough... Go Raiders!

1. Agreed.

2. American football: rugby played in protective clothing.

3. Agreed.

4. I haven't seen a single Olympics event yet, and probably won't.

5. I didn't.

Yay Roseanne Cash!

When you do something uncoordinated, like say drop something do you say, "Hand Fart"? No.

no, but i'm going to start.

God save the Open Thread.

I suppose this is a more appropriate thread for this (thanks, Eric!): Speaking of the Bush Administration's first term, let's all let this pass by!

Incidentally, following up on the saga of the me-ness that is me, I was evaluated by the county (Wake County) for depression and anxiety disorders last week, and assigned an agency, who evaluated me the day before yesterday, so I'll be starting weekly treatment next week with a therapist, as well as seeing a psychiatrist for a drug evaluation.

Turns out that they deliver! That is -- and this is good, since the bus system here is so awful, it takes an hour and a half each way to get to their office from here, and with choices of only a couple of times per afternoon or morning, and I don't drive -- the therapist will come to your house, and deliver your therapy to your door!

I hear that you get extra drugs if they're over thirty minutes late.

I expect to be cured within a month!

Also, I hope they can pick up a pizza, and drop off my dry cleaning. Full-service therapists, that's what American needs to be great again.

I just hope my request for a sex surrogate is also approved. It would really improve my mood, honest. For therapeutic reasons only.

"As a matter of fact, I'd rather not hear about it after the meal either."

You're right that before the meal is definitely best.

"Please permanently retire the following expressions from the English language"

Can I add "pie hole" to the list, please?

"So why, then, when you make a mental error would you call it a brain fart?"

Because it's another kind of unintentional error, actually.

But one will never eliminate any expression without offering a better, or at least equal, substitute. And without ninjas. Ya gotta have ninjas to kill everyone who uses the expression. Carrot and stick.

"Why, when people visit New York City, do they feel the compulsion to" stop dead still at the top of the subway stairs to gaze in awe? Get outta my way, I'm late!

Also: in the middle of a busy sidewalk.

"roaming bands of Jehovah's Witnesses Lubavitchers.

"What is it about NYC that leads to this bizarre tendency?"

The city inspires aspirations to the sophisticated I'm one of you look.

"f/k/a the Closed Thread Condemnation Affiliate"

Blog Thread Renewal, we calls it.

When you do something uncoordinated, like say drop something do you say, "Hand Fart"?

I guess if you do something uncoordinated with your butt, it'd be a 'butt fart'.

Totally right about brain farts.

About T shirts with city/state names: I have a large collection, myself. All of them are the result of inadequate packing for trips, and the inadequacy suddenly hitting me while I'm in the airport. (As in: oh hell, it's winter in MA, but of course it's not sweater weather in Florida...)

May we speak of logorrhea of the ass?

no, but i'm going to start

cleek, you owe me a keyboard.

Can I add "pie hole" to the list, please

List amended.

stop dead still at the top of the subway stairs to gaze in awe?

Agreed. That was part of an earlier rant:

http://tianews.blogspot.com/2005/06/new-yorkers-rant.html

Also: T-shirt for Mike Schilling for being all Kinky.

I'd rather not hear about it after the meal either

Well, if you insist, I can promise you that you won't hear about it. Can't make any promises that you won't hear it, though . . .

Because you want a President who is this superstitious.

For anyone who's ever wanted to be a Western water geek, this paper is the best I've ever read on the problems with economically efficient delivery of water in California. (h/t David Zetland.)

My 15th wedding anniversary is next April and I'm considering taking my wife to England and Scotland for two whole weeks! Assuming that I'm pretty much willing to bankrupt myself, what are recommendations for places to stay / things to see?

My advice: the minute you land in London, don your London T-Shirt ;)

OK, I'm going to step up and defend "brain fart". It's appropriate, in a way that "hand fart" is not.

Basically, what is a brain fart? When you say something stupid--that is, you allow something out that you would have preferred to keep in. It's not just an error, it's an error of emission, pardon the pun.

What about people wearing shirts bearing the name of their home town, while in their home town, which no one from more than 50 miles away has ever heard of? That happens where I live, and it's not kids wearing high school stuff or something like that. They sell the t-shirts, sweatshirts, polo shirts and hats at the local supermarket. And people buy them. Did they not pack properly for their trip to the supermarket?

There are worse things than buying a "New York" shirt in New York.

There's going to a city thousands of miles away, buying a keepsake, getting home, and learning that it was manufactured in your home town.

Don't forget to check out fafblog.

"roaming bands of Jehovah's Witnesses Lubavitchers.

The folks for Chabad Lubavitch will only hound you if you're already Jewish. Goyim, they are not interested in converting.

Apropos of nothing other than the "vaudeville" tag in the title, I recently found out that when my great-grandfather was young, he ran away from the Italian army and traveled around Europe as a strong man in a circus.

Noone in my family remembers him as being anything other than a cranky old guy who never talked. It's fun to realize he had another side.

Thanks -

"My advice: the minute you land in London, don your London T-Shirt ;)"

Ask everyone why they don't drive on the right. Be sure to tell everyone that whatever it is, it's better in America. Praise George W. Bush at every opportunity. Ask where you can get Miller Lite. Complain that you can't understand why you couldn't bring your gun. Go to Wales and talk a lot about how great it is here in merry old England, eh, wot.

And inquire why everyone isn't talking like Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins.

If you do all that, it won't matter where you go: you'll have the same good time everywhere!

Oh, and try to fatten up for the trip.

McCain doesn't even know what kind of car he drives.

yessir... a real man of the people, that McCain

One place that comes close to NYC in the density of tourists wearing clothing with the name of the city is San Francisco. A lot of that may be because the hicks expect SF to be HOT in the summer, but still......

Late-breaking Veep rumors: everyone will say who?

Late-breaking Veep rumors: everyone will say who?

I wonder if people who placed bets on an Obama/Edwards ticket about 6 weeks ago will be entitled to claim their winnings?

I hate the media. A candidate can talk for two hours about issues, make a joke about the other candidate for ten seconds, and then the media will *only* play that ten second clip and complain about how the candidate isn't substantive and isn't talking about issues.

*They* are the ones not being substantive. *They* are the ones not talking about issues.

Criticizing others for something they are not causing but you in fact are is pretty darned low.

Eric,

I saw some of highlights of the Radiers' last preseason game and JaMarcus Russell looks much improved over last season, when I believe he missed most of training camp due to a holdout.

At 260 pounds, this kid is a freak for a QB, as you know. If he ever puts it all together, watch out.

One thing I don't understand: How teams draft -- and pay out the mouth -- for these young quarterbacks and then don't surround them with really good receivers. I'm thinking about Tennessee and Vince Young.

For that matter -- save the season we had Terrell Owens -- the Eagles haven't done Donovan McNabb any justice. The guy deserves to have an Owens on his roster every year.

Not-so-bold prediction: Favre will flop in New York.

And:

Shockey will still be Shockey in New Orleans -- no better, no worse.

Eli Manning will throw close to 30 touchdowns.

Daniel Snyder will get tired of Jim Zorn real fast.

Chad Johnson and the Bengals will underachieve. Again.

Aaron Rodgers and the Packers will win the NFC Central.

Mike Martz will be labeled a genius again when this J.T. O'Sullivan kid is this year's Derek Anderson.

Braylon Edwards will catch more TD passes than Randy Moss.

Marion Barber -- my favorite running back because I love his take-no-prisoners running style (which is some kind of sin for an Eagles fan to admit) will lead the NFL in touchdowns.

NFL analysts will finally wake up and stop saying the Baltimore Ravens have a great defense. Or maybe not.

And I give my wife until Halloween to tell me she is sick and tired of all the football her husband watches.

Hey, only I can retire colloquialisms. You might not know that because of how I haven't advertised this privilege, but none the less, the power has been granted to me. I saw no one was responsible for removing overused, outdated colloquialisms, realized someone needed to step up, and decided that person would be me. In other words, I called it first.

Not that you suggestions are bad, I'll definitely consider them for next year's roster, but this year's has already been decided. For 2008, the offically retired colloquialism was:

"Underwhelming"

(applause)

Thank you, just doing my duty. Also, no sense bothering me with claims of "but I like it!", or "I still use it!" or "I just learnt it!"... the reason this power rests with a single, self-appointed individual is so that the decision can be made and we can simply move on. There is no system for appeals.

"I actually enjoyed watching Olympic badminton."

Olympic sport that I do not get: speed walking.

These runners -- I mean, walkers -- appear to be in as much pain as the marathon runners.

Speed walking -- isn't that an oxymoron?

(the original) Francis:

It may be more inviting since I was there in 1992 but I'd advise against visiting New Castle -- the place where they make New Castle Brown Ale, a great (and strong) beer -- on the way up to Scotland.

Visiting a friend in Manchester, we headed up there for a weekend to see an old flame of his and a blind date for me. When his friend answered the door, she greeted us and invited us in -- when we went out to get our weekend bags about 10 minutes later, the car was totally empty. Apparently, New Castle is a really rough town -- I can only attest to that one experience because I drank too much of their famous brown ale after that.

I regret to this day that we veered off for some other adventure and I didn't get to see Scotland.

Good luck.

When I was in college I once horned my way into a badmitton match with some asians.

I left with welps all over my body.

I completely respect that sport.

I was going to mention SF as the only other city, as my SF friends have told me it is so, but I don't know. I go every year in April for bizness, and haven't quite seen it.

SF gets the silver medal. You'll just have to make due with that.

Bedtime:

You fill me with hope, and I agree with most of your predictions. Especially Marion the Barbarian. Animal.

To quote my mother: "I hope my funeral isn't on a Sunday during football season." Sunday's belong to me and my TV. Lookin all lovely.

When I was in college I once horned my way into a badmitton match with some asians.

Dude? Did you challenge them in ping pong afterward?

For 2008, the offically retired colloquialism was:

"Underwhelming"

It's not a colloquialism. It's a plain old word.

I am not whelmed by this choice.

"Sunday's belong to me and my TV."

I mentioned something to that effect before giving up bachelorhood four years ago and, my wife is a saint in many ways, but she broke this "vow."

NFL studio analyst who I know it's not fashionable to like but I do: Deion Sanders.

NFL Network gem: Jamie Dukes -- network TV would never take the big guy which is one reason he is such a delight to watch.

NFL game anaylst who you are "supposed" to love but I don't: John Madden (although I realize he's much better than most). I was thinking the other night when I saw Madden on TV: He's been the big-name color guy for CBS, FOX, ABC and NBC. Amazing.

Nobody does highlights better than: Chris Berman. What a shame they did away with "NFL Primetime" when NBC got Sunday nights -- he and Tom Jackson, like Young and Rice in the studio.

Overexposed: Cris Collingsworth. But that's because he's good.

I miss: Curt Gowdy, Howard Cosell and Hank Stram.

Sorry to all non-fans for all of the football talk, promise that's it, except:

R.I.P. Gene Upshaw.

I miss Cossell too. He was just plain fun to listen to

Cute Overload features The Lonely, Desolate Life of Sniper Kitty

So, it isn't Kaine or Bayh.

Good. Sebelius or Biden seem more promising. The virtues of an obscure Texas congressman seem... obscure.

"Some associates of Mr. Biden were informed by the Obama campaign to stand ready for television interviews on Saturday."

Make of that what you will. Gee, maybe they're to be ready to express their disappointment?

It's Biden, says the NY Times:

Senator Barack Obama has chosen Senator Joseph R. Biden Jr. of Delaware to be his running-mate, turning to a leading authority on foreign policy and a longtime Washington hand to fill out the Democratic ticket, people told of the decision said.

You aren't getting much useful advice. I love Highgate Cemetary (and no, not just to visit Karl Marx's grave), think the London Eye is worth it (you can buy tickets on-line for specific times and miss the queues), tend to eat at Wagamamas (because Belfast has only recently started doing noddle bars) and love the Natural History Museum of just the simple beauty of the building and the V&A. Oh and walk across the bridge to the tate Modern. I also like Chester (but then I would tell you do not forget Wales...North Wales to be specific. Go and see some proper castles--Conway and Harlech to be specific. But travelling within Wales can be a bit brutal and well I can tell far worse stories of Cardiff than som ehave of Newcastle a city now known for how little its female members will wear out on a winter night for clubbing).

Scotland--Go to St. Andrew's. No, not for the golf. For the ruined cathedral, the castle and the tunnels dug under the walls to take the castle. If you had more time, I'd tell you to hit the Orkneys. I think Glasgow is more vibrant than Edinburgh. Skye is beautiful and there is a lot to be said for single malt. Oh and order yourself a sticky toffee pudding. I have friends who swear that is the best advice I gave them for their first trip to the UK. Now, if you were to come to Norn Iron, I could be much more specific on telling you where to go. But the first question is, what do you like?

You aren't getting much useful advice.

I don't think it's possible to give useful advice to someone who asks in such a blanket way.

what do you like?

Exactly! Beer? Food? Castles? Landscape? Churches? History?

some more mundane suggestions for travel, I assume you are going into Heathrow, and last year, the place was a mess, with no signage. Nothing worse than starting or ending your trip getting lost around the airport.

Train costs were unbelieveable, though coach seemed much more reasonable. There was also internet reservable tickets that were really cheap, but required having an internet connection and a printer. And hotel internet was ridiculously expensive.

I stayed in London 25 years ago, but if I could take my wife there, I would spend a week going to the theatre and the Proms">http://www.bbc.co.uk/proms/2008/">Proms concerts, if you are there during that time.

Francis -- my daughter and I spent 2 weeks in London, York, and Edinburgh last month. It did nearly bankrupt me, but it was a wonderful trip.

In York we stayed at Heworth House (website at www.yorkcity.co.uk). Very lovely -- not as central as some B&B's, but an easy walk to town and lovely host and hostess. We had a 3rd floor room under the eaves with skylights, very beautiful, free wireless, about 70 pounds a night for the 2 of us. I'd go back happily. York Minster was my favorite single site/sight of the whole trip. Little Yorkshire Museum was nice too.

In London we stayed at a couple of places (the trip was planned on short notice at the height of the summer season so choices were more limited than they might have been). The best was Morgan House (http://www.morganhouse.co.uk/). Modest B&B in Belgravia, near Victoria Station. We had an inexpensive room (again about 70 pounds) with a bath and shower in the hall (but never a problem sharing), free wireless throughout the house.

I wasn't thrilled with the place we stayed at in Edinburgh (it was nice enough but had too many rules), so I won't mention it.

Edinburgh was my least favorite of the 3 cities, but I loved the castle. As with the London Eye and lots and lots of other places you might visit, you can book tickets online ahead of time (for the Castle, you don't have to name a time for the visit) and pick them up when you get there.

York is small but very fun. London was overwhelmingly wonderful. I could walk around London for months without doing anything in particular and be very glad to have been there. I didn't go on the Eye (I have difficulty with vertigo so it didn't seem like a good idea). I second walking across the Millennium Bridge; we did it going away from the Tate Modern, toward St. Pauls, early on a beautiful sunny morning.

I used the Rick Steves guides to choose lodging and was happy with the results.

Trains are expensive. And crowded. And yes, you can book online but you need a printer. We booked -- late -- at Victoria Station. Bad idea: long lines at the ticket booths, expensive tickets, partly because last minute. The pricing is bizarre, but in general (so I was told, and it seemed true) the later you book, the more expensive it is. We had a simple itinerary: London to York to Edinburgh and back to London, which would have lent itself to Britrail point to point tickets. But I didn't realize that these could only be bought from home, not within Britain. And I'm not sure those tickets allow seat reservations, which would have been a problem at the times we traveled. If you're going to travel by train a lot and can plan the itinerary ahead, get tickets as far ahead as possible.

Rick Steves was also good on food: If you go to York, Cafe Concerto was very nice and Cafe No. 8 had fantastic food. In Edinburgh: David Bann's (I think Jes mentioned this and so did Rick Steves' guide).

Sit-down meals are very very very expensive (especially with the current exchange rate). There is more tax than on take-away. Places that don't visibly do take-away probably also don't have containers to let you take away unused food from your meal. Wait staff doesn't bring the bill, you have to ask for it. (Apparently.)

If I think of more practicalities, or if you'd like my own idiosyncratic impressions and favorite things, I could go on and on. But not right now.

Francis -- there are various ways of getting passes for the Tube in London. We bought Oyster cards when we arrived at Heathrow. You put money on them (10 pounds at a time I believe) and pay a 3 pound deposit on the card. They are rechargeable. When you're leaving, you can get the 3 pounds back, and any money left on the card. They just handed us the cash back.

I bought 3 maps of London, besides the info in the section of the Steves guide. The one I used the most was the Knopf Mapguide, with 8 fold-out maps of sections of the city. There are lists of things to, phone #'s, etc. I didn't use the commercial suggestions (night life, restaurants, etc.), but the maps were priceless -- incredibly useful.

Francis:

Never been, but my parents went about 20 yrs ago. I can't tell you anything they saw that was especially memorable for them but they did bring back a curse upon me and my little brother. Seems nearly every town in Scotland has a distillery. So in every town they stopped in, they went to the local distillery and toured it. Then bought a few sample bottles. They came back with about a dozen different types of singlemalt (most of which I have never seen again), and threw a tasting party.

I have been drinking single malt (or at least, as much as my wallet will allow) ever since.

Francis, I was in London for a few days two years ago -- actually I've been there several times in the last couple. One thing that was a total hoot: I rented a car and drove out to Stonehenge.

Another thing that was interesting and under-touristed was the Churchill war room, in London.

"but the maps were priceless -- incredibly useful."

You didn't get a London A to Zed like I told you to? :-)

We gave JanieM a bunch of tips here.

cob: Seems nearly every town in Scotland has a distillery.

...but of course. What else does one do on long winter evenings?

Janie M: Oyster cards ... You put money on them (10 pounds at a time I believe) and pay a 3 pound deposit on the card. They are rechargeable. When you're leaving, you can get the 3 pounds back, and any money left on the card.

What an excellent system. Why are they called Oyster cards?

Wikipedia has this.

A number of alternative names were considered; however, Oyster was chosen as a fresh approach that was not directly linked to transport, ticketing or London. According to Andrew McCrum, now of Appella brand name consultants, who was brought in to find a name by Saatchi and Saatchi Design (in turn contracted by TranSys), Oyster was conceived and subsequently promoted because of the metaphorical implications of security and value in the component meanings of the hard bivalve shell and the concealed pearl. Its associations with London through Thames estuary oyster beds and the popular idiom 'the world is your oyster' were also significant factors in its selection as was the uniqueness of the word Oyster

Oyster cards:

[...] The Oyster brand name was agreed after a lengthy period of research managed by TranSys, the company contracted to deliver the ticketing system in London, and agreed by Transport for London. A number of alternative names were considered; however, Oyster was chosen as a fresh approach that was not directly linked to transport, ticketing or London. According to Andrew McCrum, now of Appella brand name consultants, who was brought in to find a name by Saatchi and Saatchi Design (in turn contracted by TranSys), Oyster was conceived and subsequently promoted because of the metaphorical implications of security and value in the component meanings of the hard bivalve shell and the concealed pearl. Its associations with London through Thames estuary oyster beds and the popular idiom 'the world is your oyster' were also significant factors in its selection as was the uniqueness of the word Oyster.[citation needed]

The intellectual property rights to the Oyster brand belong to the operator Transys. Following the early termination of the operating contract, it was not clear if TfL could continue to use the Oyster name without buying out the rights from Transys, or if the system would have to be given a new name.[7]

NYC's MTA has used rechargeable Metrocards for buses and subway for much longer, but Boston's predate both.

Theatre. Walking around. Ruins. Food (though if that were the core of the trip we'd be going to Lyons [yes, I've heard that some of the best restaurants in the world are in London -- but as I'm half-French I'm genetically required to disbelieve that]). Museums. Renting a car and exploring out-of-the-way places. Obscure scotches. Steeplechasing?

Oh, and try to fatten up for the trip.

I've seen endless well-marbled Brits parading into Central Florida. Possibly the Disney parks attract that sort disproportionately.

Ok, well, we've got similar annoyances here in Florida. Folks buying Orlando and SeaWorld and Disney apparel as if they stopped making it last week, and wearing it. Here. At Disney. I have no idea what that's about.

People: when you visit the beach, here, wear sunscreen. I highly recommend SPF 50 (it's what I use) or so, if you're going to frolic on the beach all day. Otherwise you're going to end up a rather radioactive shade of magenta, and your life will be a living hell for the next couple of days.

Oh, and please read the following at least one thousand times before visiting here:

If you miss your exit, or your turn, it's not the end of the world. You can turn around at the next opportunity (and there will be one, I promise) and go back. Pulling over to the side of a busy interstate and driving in reverse down the shoulder to get back to your exit is not necessary. Neither is crossing four lanes of traffic when you, at the last second, realize that you were supposed to turn right at this intersection, not left.

Oh, and if you don't know where to go next, I highly recommend pulling into the next convenient parking lot (there will be one, I promise) and getting it sorted out, instead of arguing amongst yourselves at a speed of 20 mph in a 45 mph zone.

Please don't complain about the crowds at the amusement parks. They don't bother me in the slightest, because I only go during the slack season (or, better, when there's a hurricane nearby), if at all. Don't complain to me about the price, either, because it's your willingness to pay that price that has the price as high as it is. I'm sure there are plenty of fun and inexpensive things to do closer to where you're from; I highly recommend that you investigate them.

Stop that.

And use "one" in the first person singular.


out, out, damned italics.

Gee, Slart, posting your comment without closing your italics tag, then deleting it after I've closed it, and reposting it again below mine, four minutes later?

Tsk.

Eh?

Maybe it's Typepad being screwy, the way it's been for several weeks, as I've noted a couple of times, for instance, when one clicks on a comment on the sidebar, it's often jumping to a previous iteration of the page, with the comment or later comments being missing. Unless that's just my browser going weird.

But your italics-unclosed comment had appeared at 10:56 a.m., and then subsequently disappeared and reappeared with a time-stamp of 11 a.m., and now is back to being as of 10:56 a.m. At least, as seen on my Firefox 2.0016.

I've got a Charlie card for the MBTA. As far as I know, they don't give you money back when you leave. But then, I come and go constantly and am not a tourist, so I've never checked.

Gary -- by the time I mentioned here that I was going on that trip, I was already so loaded down with possibilities and paraphernalia that no....I didn't get London A to Zed. But believe me, I've filed away all the suggestions for my fantasized longer-trip-someday! It's just a matter of how I'm going to finagle that. ;)

There are also "Travelcards" for the Tube, which are a set price (or a max, I forget which) for some number of days. Our time in London was broken up into two short phases so none of those options made as much sense as an Oyster card, which also gives some of the price ceiling per day effect of the Travel Card. Rick Steves' guidebook explains it all but it's so complicated that in the end I almost flipped a coin.

Wierd, Gary. I did go back and fix it; possibly the duplicate was one of Typepad's brain farts.

8p

Gary -- it's not just your browser. It's doing that for me, too. And I don't think it's just ObWi. I'm pretty sure it has happened at 3 Quarks Daily (which is also blogs.com).

Okay, as to travelcards, I just read whaat I wrote above...

Max and set price are the same idea. Duh. But there is something complicated about Travelcards that I don't recall right now and don't care about at this anyhow.

I guess I'm a little addled with having just gotten out of bed (for the second time today).

My son is leaving tomorrow for a year in a remote place in China. I am excited for his adventure, but inside (trying not to dump it on him, though I'm sure he knows) having a little tad of trouble with the concept of possibly not seeing him for the entire year. I will try to visit at some point....but that remains to be seen. If I do, this (non-calendar) year will have a been a heap of travel for me after 11 years without getting on an airplane. (Not a deliberate decision, just that I wasn't going anywhere I couldn't drive to.....)

Unless that's just my browser going weird.

nope, i see it too.

I've been getting the out-of-date pages as well, Gary (though not changing order of comments). I find that holding down the shift key while clicking "Reload" gets me the current version of the page.

Pitlochry. It's a couple of hour's drive from Glasgow, set in the middle of some beautiful Scottish hills, and home to the Pitlochry Festival Theatre. You can get to see 4 different plays in 3 days and take some lovely walks the rest of the time.

"I actually enjoyed watching Olympic badminton. Don't know what that says about me, but there you have it."

It says that badminton is *awesome*!!! No longer will we accept just being tennis' bastard offspring. The revolution is coming...

"I actually enjoyed watching Olympic badminton. Don't know what that says about me, but there you have it."

It says that badminton is *awesome*!!! No longer will we accept just being tennis' bastard offspring. The revolution is coming...

"I miss Cossell too."

Loved the way he used to poke fun at Frank Gifford.

They say Cosell never used a script for his famous halftime higlights or, later in life, in his radio reports (that he kept time in his head and, obviously, had no problem speaking off the top of it).

Sad that he became bitter late in life.

"Bitter old man" -- hope no ever can use that phrase about me in 25 years or so.

"I miss Cossell too."

Loved the way he used to poke fun at Frank Gifford.

They say Cosell never used a script for his famous halftime higlights or, later in life, in his radio reports (that he kept time in his head and, obviously, had no problem speaking off the top of it).

Sad that he became bitter late in life.

"Bitter old man" -- hope no one can ever use that phrase about me in 25 years or so.

Someone might want to update the link in the sidebar to Yglesias' blog.

Earlier this week, we had quite a discussion in the "Support the Troops" thread about how you could do just that and be against the Iraq war at the same time.

I'm not sure it would change anyone's mind on either side of the fence. But I'd suggest "Generation Kill" as Exhibit A as a demonstration of why this argument is so complex.

I just finished watching the final episode minutes ago and this entry in particular was one of the best, most unvarnished things I have ever seen on television.

My linking instructions are at work but here is the Wikipedia entry:

"Generation Kill (2004) is a book written by Rolling Stone journalist Evan Wright chronicling his experience as an embedded reporter with the 1st Reconnaissance Battalion‎ during the 2003 invasion of Iraq. His account of life with the Marines was originally published as a three-part series in Rolling Stone in the fall of 2003. "The Killer Elite", the first of these articles, went on to win a National Magazine Award for Excellence in Reporting in 2004.[1]"

Thank goodness it's over:

These Olympics certainly had something for everyone -- I don't think I've ever been so excited watching swimming -- but the Games do seem to go on forever.

NBC has received decent reviews its presentation of these Olympics. But I think they can primarily thank Michael Phelps and the gymnastics rivalry between the U.S. and China. The network, to me, covered the Olympiad not much different than it presents, say, NFL football and, for the most part, put a happy face on China.

In the current issue of Sports Illustrated -- the one with Phelps on the cover decked out in his eight golds -- Selena Roberts writes an essay that puts a spotlight on how deftly the Chinese government manipulated NBC, the IOC and anyone who watched the Games and fell for that happy face.

1. Guilty.

2. I just can't get excited about football until that first fall chill starts to hit. And that's usually not until mid-September; later now that I've moved further South.

3a. Agreed.
3b. Dan Miller gets this exactly right.

4. I feel the same way about curling in the Winter Olympics. Only I still don't fully understand curling.

5. Agreed.

For anyone who's ever wanted to be a Western water geek, this paper is the best I've ever read on the problems with economically efficient delivery of water in California.

The problem with water in California: The North's got it and the South needs it. The South's biggest problem has been how to get water from the North without paying more than a pittance.

(Born in Northern Cal, live in S Cal.)

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when we went out to get our weekend bags about 10 minutes later

That's what you get for bringing coals!

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NFL game anaylst who you are "supposed" to love but I don't: John Madden

I hate the Thugs Raiders; I hate Madden; I REALLY hated Madden when he was with the Raiders.

From Feministe to Racialiscious to http://www.the99.org/>"The 99": Comic book heroes as aspects of Allah (the 99 Beautiful names of Allah). Looks fun!

Eric,

I thought about you last night while watching the Raider game. What a mess.

I think you can't begin to criticize the coaching until you give the guy something to work with. So I guess that points to Al Davis.

Russell doesn't even seem close to being an NFL quarterback.

To me, they are almost too young. They really seem to be failing in free agency, which used to be a Raider strength.

As for me, I had such good success in my fantasy league last year with Tom Brady that I took him with the No. 4 overall pick and now he's done. Our league weighs QBs more heavily than most, so I also have Romo -- but I paid a price in WR and RB for taking such good QBs. Toss that strategy right out the door.

Good luck.

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