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May 18, 2007

Comments

"it will be interesting to see who Bush picks,"
and why, tell me, if the bank belongs to 180 governments, does Bush get to pick the successor?

This blogger suggested:

It is traditional in the Bush regime to replace a bad choice (e.g. John Ashcroft) with a much worse choice (e.g. Alberto Gonzales).

Since we’re talking about Paul Wolfowitz here, “a much worse choice” will have to be very bad indeed. My money’s on Ahmed Chalabi.

But it's also worth noting that Harriet Miers has had some time to unwind.

A penny for the Guy.

I thought it wasn't my birthday for several months yet.

I must work harder on my remember, remember.

needs of an institution whose aim is to eliminate poverty

Er, no. The goal of the World Bank is to keep poor countries just as badly off as they ever were.

Wolfowitz behaved badly and appointing him to be President of a global institution was a mistake, if the institution was meant to be run well.

The World Bank is an evil institution, however, whose aim is to maintain inequality.

He deserves to be buried at the bottom of a diamond mine beneath all the rubble excavated therefrom ...

Wait, isn't this the thread about Falwell's deserved resting place?

why, tell me, if the bank belongs to 180 governments, does Bush get to pick the successor?

the best answer i could find was: the US gets to pick the president because a) that's the way it's always been and b) the US is the largest donor.

why, tell me, if the bank belongs to 180 governments, does Bush get to pick the successor?

There's an unwritten agreement that the US appoints the President of the World Bank, and the IMF job goes to a European. The remaining 85% of the world get to suck it up.

John Bolton would be an excellent replacement.

Now I know nabalzbbfr is someone's idea of a joke.

i was thinking Charles Keating, or maybe Jeff Skilling. them's some fine financial minds.

Sad that Mr. Abram is off at the moment(alas poor Jack). Such an expert in dealing in corruption. ;-)

well hilzoy, if you don't marry Anarch for that earlier thread title, you can marry me for this one.

I feel pretty bad for Wolfowitz's girlfriend, not that I understand what she was doing with him in the first place. She's been dragged over the coals for this, her career (which apparently was quite well-deserved) is probably toast, and she hasn't been able to say a damned thing about it.

Jackmormon: I feel pretty bad for generic women in this kind of situation. My sympathy for this particular woman, however, which started out quite high, sank considerably when I read the whole Bank report, including the transcript of their interview with her.

A large part of the reason why her salary went up so much was that she hadn't gotten a promotion that she regarded herself as entitled to (this was before W. was at the Bank), and so when she made a proposal, she included this promotion, which she hadn't gotten, as part of the baseline and insisted on keeping it there. It was one of those promotions that involves a considerable step-up in salary, so it had a pretty major effect. (She also asked for guaranteed further promotions that, as I understand it, would only have been remotely likely if she had gotten the original one several years earlier.)

I have no idea what the merits of her complaint about the previous promotion are, obviously, but this was absolutely not the way to deal with them.

(NB: in writing this, of course, I am not meaning to let anyone else off the hook. I find her insistence on her promotions, pay raises, etc., wrong but more comprehensible than W's going along with them.)

Wish I could remember where I read this; it was in a comment on one of the blogs yesterday - probably Atrios, or Digby, or DKos. But since it was speculation anyhow, I'll repeat it as speculation here: the poster thought Tony Blair would like to have this job. And that Bush might find it hard to say "no" to him, under the circumstances.

If nothing else, an interesting idea.

Notwithstanding the thread title, I suspect Wolfowitz is going to end up doing pretty okay when all is said and done. Much like a few other organized groups I can think of, the conservative movement honors its martyrs.

I feel pretty bad for Wolfowitz's girlfriend, not that I understand what she was doing with him in the first place. She's been dragged over the coals for this, her career (which apparently was quite well-deserved) is probably toast, and she hasn't been able to say a damned thing about it.

She had plenty of chances to say things, especially to Wolfowitz, like "Let me succeed or fail on my own" and "Don't meddle with my career", and "Using your position to arrange this type of raise for me is unethical."

Hilzoy: A large part of the reason why her salary went up so much was that she hadn't gotten a promotion that she regarded herself as entitled to (this was before W. was at the Bank)

Where are you getting that from? My understanding (mostly from wikipedia/linked sources) was that Riza had been acting manager for external affairs and outreach in the MENA region since 2002, and was, until Wolfowitz was nominated to be President of the World Bank, shortlisted for the permanent role.

She might of course not have gotten the permanent role even if Wolfowitz hadn't been nominated, but as the acting manager for the previous three years, she'd clearly have been in a very strong position to be appointed into the permanent position - but once her partner had become President, she was dropped from the shortlist, because of the conflict of interest involved.

Since I gather they're still together, Riza is evidently not casting blame for her situation where it justly belongs - on Wolfowitz. But I've encountered situations like that where a woman will blame anyone other than the man she's involved with - and while it makes it difficult to help a woman who won't accept where the blame rightly belongs, it doesn't prevent me from feeling sympathetic towards her.

Michael Cain: She had plenty of chances to say things, especially to Wolfowitz, like "Let me succeed or fail on my own" and "Don't meddle with my career", and "Using your position to arrange this type of raise for me is unethical."

Well, yeah: I also feel that she should have split up with Wolfowitz when she realized he was happy to destroy her career in order to improve her own. She should have realized that when Wolfowitz accepted the World Bank presidency, the damage this did to her career was inevitable and unavoidable, and the only way to minimize it would be to leave the World Bank for another job. She should have told Wolfowitz right from the start that if he cared for and respected her, he would tell Bush not to nominate him to the World Bank Presidency. As far as we know, she did none of those things. People in abusive relationships - and what Wolfowitz did to her constituted a form of abuse - often don't think straight.

Maybe he'd stopped beating her by then, though.

The World Bank should indeed clear Wolfowitz's name. In fact, I've got a great speech already written:

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury the World Bank, not to praise it.
The evil that men do lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones;
So let it be with the World Bank. The noble Wolfowitz
Hath told you the World Bank was ambitious:
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath the World Bank answer'd it.
Here, under leave of Wolfowitz and the rest--
For Wolfowitz is an honourable man ...

Slarti: Maybe he'd stopped beating her by then, though.

Nice way to avoid the issue, Slarti.

Wolfowitz showed that he neither respected Riza nor cared for her. That's abusive.

Jes: from the appendices to the report, and the report itself. (The appendices involve e.g. interviews with her, W, etc.) I wasn't meaning to say anything about the justice of her grievance about the promotion, just that getting her boyfriend to make it as though she had already gotten it was not the way to deal with it.

Jes: specifically, see here (pdf), pp. 18-19, where they quote Riza as saying (about how she arrived at the salary figure she asked for): "I looked at that and I said, where wouldI be had they given me my H level when they should have given it to me?"

That's from pp. 28-9 of her interview, which (in its entirety) is here.

I have to go with Steve at 10:12. Not only will this not kill Wolfoquitz' career, it won't even slow it down. The question we should all be asking ourselves is, what job will Bush give Wolfy after he leaves the World Bank?

Has Bolton's replacement at the UN been chosen?

No, never mind that, it's all come clear to me now. This is why Bush hasn't fired Gonzo yet. He's keeping the seat warm for Wolfy.

Does anybody want to tell me that I'm crazy?

Anybody?

Please?

And if anybody wants to argue that the senate would never vote to confirm Wolfy as attorney general, I have two words for you: recess appointment.

Does anybody want to tell me I'm being silly?

Anybody?

"Has Bolton's replacement at the UN been chosen?"

Sure. Zalmay">http://www.un.int/usa/khalilzad.htm">Zalmay Khalilzad, our former Iraq Ambassador, formerly our Afghanistan Ambassador, formerly formerly formerly.

"Does anybody want to tell me I'm being silly?"

If you're being serious: you're being silly.

Something I thought of, recently - Bush can't make recess appointments if Congress doesn't go into recess, can he?

This doesn't mean that Congresspeople can't leave town, just that there's somebody there, technically keeping Congress open.

It'd be unprecedented, and a breach of tradition.

Which is why Bush deserves it.

Hilzoy rejoices in an American who is trying to fix a corrupt organization being framed.

I wish I could say I surprised that she is for the other side.

And it is good to know that you are such a strong feminist.

I guess I will file this one away with your strong condemnation of Opie and Anthony's dicussion of raping the Condoleeza Rice and Laura Bush.

Good God. Seriously, why put up with this?

Add Paulson to the list of good Bush appointments.

My (German) morning papers actually discuss the possibility of Tony "Poodle" Blair being Wolfowitz' successor (he quits job 3 days before Wolfie and is therfore available). But Bush is also quoted as intending to appoint an American. Hm, maybe a speed naturalization for Tony in sight ;-).

It'll be good lesson for his successors in the future,they'll think to commit mistakes...Highest donor alone not a merit for choosing world bank's new CEO,So i think every member country have to be given chance in selecting new CEO..Its not fare to let USA(Bush) dominate..
European Breakdown Cover

Another Straussian bites the dust. We see again that followers of Leo Strauss., the totalitarian political sci. guy who was the main guidance for the crowd clustered around Bush, are being cut down one after another. Wolfowitz was a main one, and his conduct at the Bank shows exactly the arrogance and contempt for the opinion of others that you would expect from a Straussian. They believe that ordinary people are far too stupid to be allowed to decide political matters for themselves, so the decisions should be made by the "wise ones" who will of course not tell them what it is really all about but will spin out high sounding lies and keep the political climate scary with a series of alarms and small wars, to keep the people in line. An insider and architect of the Iraq war project, a principal operator for Bush, a truly bad guy if you support democracy. A liar and porker-at-the-trough to the end, it could not happen to a nicer guy.

Steve: Good God. Seriously, why put up with this?

Agreed.

Hilzoy: I wasn't meaning to say anything about the justice of her grievance about the promotion, just that getting her boyfriend to make it as though she had already gotten it was not the way to deal with it.

No. It's just that - as I see it - Wolfowitz had put her in a position where she really had no good way to deal with it. I do hate to say "She should've dumped him!" but this is one of those instances where I really want to say it.

an American who is trying to fix a corrupt organization being framed

Is that the spin? Wolfie was framed?

Where, oh where, does the buck ever stop with these clowns? Seriously. Is there any mistake that they take responsibility for?

The terms of Wolfowitz's employment were crystal clear. He was expected to avoid even the chance impression of any impropriety. That required him to go above and beyond the call of duty in ensuring no one could frame him. He failed. He's out. End of discussion.

Edward_, bril is a troll. DNFTT.

Framed or not, Wolfie failed to comply with the terms of his contract. Perhaps that's a high standard, but that was the job. There was a time when the pro-business right-wing of this country undestood and championed such positions. They can't cry foul when they're asked to measure up to their own standards.

Wijffels, who headed the ad-hoc investigation committee, is quoted a lot these days in the Netherlands. Favorite quote = "Wolfowitz was a disastrous manager".

He says that "though public figures always must try to behave flawless, if he had been a really good manager things might have gone different" (roughly translated).

Wijffels, who headed the ad-hoc investigation committee, is quoted a lot these days in the Netherlands. Favorite quote = "Wolfowitz was a disastrous manager".

He says that "though public figures always must try to behave flawless, if he had been a really good manager things might have gone different" (roughly translated).

Oops, sorry for the double post, I thought I had stopped it in time when I noticed I forgot to link to a Dutch interview.

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