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April 11, 2007

Comments

"It could be that I am simply smarter than everyone who has ever worked in government so no one has ever thought of this idea before. However, I doubt that."

I wouldn't doubt for a moment that you might be smarter than anyone assigned to such a project. But I strongly suspect that such a project would be strongly resisted, by liberals. Which is why I think you would have to convince them.

"Seb, I'm trying really hard to believe that you have real concerns about voter fraud, as opposed to a desire to reduce minority voting. However, it would be easier to do that if you showed a little interest in actual voter fraud investigations. Alternatively, you could continue to argue that we cannot ever measure voter fraud without imposing radical identification requirements."

You may have confused me with someone who has actual power. I regret to admit that I don't. As for radical identification requirements for voting, lots of other countries require some sort of actual identification. It isn't unheard of. I'm not saying that is dispositive--just that it isn't radical.

Who are the authorities who can order that a business not give employees a paid day off, and what authority did those authorities use?

I assume it was based on a law saying you can't offer someone anything of value as enticement to vote. A paid day off is something of value.

You could give all your employees Election Day as a paid day off, naturally. But a law like that would prohibit you from conditioning it on actually voting. It's a fine distinction, I grant you.

"I assume it was based on a law saying you can't offer someone anything of value as enticement to vote."

Is it illegal in some places to do that, rather than it being illegal to offer someone anything of value as enticement to vote in a specific way?

I'm not disagreeing: I just hadn't realized or been aware of that, if so. Does anyone have a pointer on how widespread such laws are? (Yes, I can google, but I'm feeling lazy, and not to mention crappy, so I'm asking first.)

Sebastian... "I lived out of my car for two months for God's sake."

Was it a Caddy or a Hummer?

Vote for your favorite song

My kid's choir

instead of

cleek doing moody stuff

I'm a balding-headed link ho now, give me some love, or else you will never actually hear Thullen.

Gary: Is it illegal in some places to do that [offer someone anything of value as enticement to vote], rather than it being illegal to offer someone anything of value as enticement to vote in a specific way?

Yes; in Virginia and Iowa at least, and I believe in many places.

The rationale is, I think, that there are many precincts in which an overwhelming majority of the voters vote one way or the other, so that offering an enticement of value has the effect of an enticement to vote in a specific way.

Common Sense, the procedure you describe is cluster sampling. (As you doubtless know.)

Which means I imagine Republicans would have two problems with it:

One: if the objective is to find out if voter fraud is a widespread problem, it would be only sensible to make clear that the data in the survey can't and won't be used to prosecute or investigate any individiduals. (The UK Census has an unbreakable rule that it doesn't share its raw data with anyone, for just that reason.) I can see Republican politicians calling it an "investigation into voter fraud" rather than "a survey of voting patterns" and then complaining that the people carrying it out were "shielding criminals".

Two: Many conservatives appear to have locked themselves into the belief that cluster sampling is not an effective scientific method of getting data, because if they did believe it, they'd have to believe that around 700 000 people in Iraq have been killed as a result of the US invasion/occupation, and they don't want to. (For all I know, this will be a short-lived rejection, but where it exists, it seems to be absolute.)

"Sebastian... "I lived out of my car for two months for God's sake."

Was it a Caddy or a Hummer?"

It was a VW Rabbit, thanks for wondering.

Sebastian... "I lived out of my car for two months for God's sake."
Was it a Caddy or a Hummer?

Wow, was that spectacularly crass. Sorry about that, Sebastian.

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