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September 14, 2006

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See ya later, Bob. As we say in Texas, don't let the doorknob hit you in the ass on the way out. And take the rest of the crooks with you!

So he's an in-patient at a rehabilitation center, is he?

Will he show up in court in a wheelchair with a shawl over his knees and sporting a sippy cup like a Mafia chieftain faking a stroke?

OT - what passes for our Commander in Chief is going to have a news conference this morning to explain why we have to engage in torture, warrantless eavesdropping and star chamber trials in order to...uh, well, I'm really not sure. I guess just for the hell of it.

It should be quite hte Tour de Farce.

I think it's great that they're cleaning house. It'd be even better if they cleaned the whole house, but I'm not sure how many people would be left.

to you, Bob Ney, i lift a glass (well, a paper cup of Caribou Coffee) in the hopes that you'll drag a few of your Corrupticans* down with you.

* - CB, how'd i do?

I'm listening to it now, Ugh. I can't say that I'm impressed.

It should be quite hte Tour de Farce.

I'd much rather watch Floyd Landis again, steroids and all.

For some reason I expect every Bush press conference to end with him, frustrated from getting caught up in his words, shouting "San Dimas High School Football Rules!!!!" and marching off with his fist in the air to wild cheers from the press core.

...and then we would wake up, our hearts racing with danger averted, and it would be a lovely, sunny, January morning early in 2001, shortly before the inauguration of President Gore.

In the absence of this fantasy, I would ask Bush's handlers to convince him not to pound the podium while emphasizing the "vital importance" of "The Program." It's just too sinister for late morning, out-of-doors; save the Kruschevian theatrics for eerily lit conference-rooms, please.

The conference had its points. You could certainly see the Dubya mood swings. It was anger/fear for the torture law, back to smirking for Iraq and Iran, and hesitation for anything else.

Josh Marshall points to this suggestion that Ney got off quite easy.

I'd be in favor of Ney getting a break if he gave up a whole bunch of other crooks in exchange for said break. Looks like that wasn't the case, though. At this rate, though, we're going to be running short of congresscritters.

At this rate, though, we're going to be running short of congresscritters.

Yes, you are.

(It is kind of amusing how Republicans keep trying to make the corruption in Washington look like bipartisan scandals. But only kind of: desperation is never that funny.)

Well, to be fair, Jes, we do have some pretty skanky Democrats, although I agree the difference in seriously putrescent politicians may be an order of magnitude or more these days.

Either that, or that 100 grand just fell into Jefferson's freezer.

The difference, Slart, is that Jefferson is an aberration among Democrats. Ney is the norm among Republicans.

Ah. Well, I hope to see the crack law-enforcement agencies on top of this, pronto.

"Well, I hope to see the crack law-enforcement agencies on top of this"

I didn't think this was in the DEA's purview.

Well, to be fair, Jes, we do have some pretty skanky Democrats, although I agree the difference in seriously putrescent politicians may be an order of magnitude or more these days.

I agree, but suspect the relative degree of corruption has mostly to do with relative power.

I find it interesting that the parties do not do a better job of policing their own ranks. After all, crooks do a lot of damage to their own party, and it is obviously beneficial to avoid that, and to develop a reputation for insisting on honesty even from one's own party members. If the crook in question comes from a safely gerrymandered seat the cost is virtually nothing.

It's impossible for me to believe that the shenanigans of Cunningham, Ney, etc. were not obvious to their colleagues years ago.

Slart--
You'll be pleased to know I first parsed that as (((crack law-)(enforcement)) agencies) and immediately thought of Marion Barry.

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