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May 12, 2006

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How are telecom stocks doing today?

Let's see:

The NSA is watching me; the CIA is watching the NSA; The FBI is watching the CIA; the DOD is watching the FBI; the private sector has been contracted to watch my mother; my mother is watching the bond market; the bond market is watching the dollar; the dollar is watching the deficits; the border militia is monitoring Charlton Heston's cook, the White House is covertly watching the polls; the media doesn't know what to watch and I'm keeping an eye on DaveC.

Who's watching Osama Bin Laden?

hilzoy -

You have one of the from/to #s in the women's approval decline wrong (or the amount of decline).

Ugh: darn, you're right. Thanks. It's 32%-29%. It interested me that Bush used to be doing better among men than among women, which I'd expect, but that that seems to have changed. (Given the margin of error, his support is roughly equal in both groups.)

AmericaBlog has good T-shirts here. (NSA: Now Spying on Americans. Black T, big white NSA, smaller rest of it underneath. Looks good.)

It interested me that Bush used to be doing better among men than among women, which I'd expect, but that that seems to have changed.

Its the immigration issue I bet. The whole "they took our jobs" (can't put it in the South Park phonetics) meme likely resonates more there. Plus we're reaching The Poor Man's BTKWB limit and men had further to fall. Wilford, of course, had it coming.

As for tax gimmicks, a fun one is to change the date on which estimated corporate tax payments are due by one day for a single year, thereby shifting the revenue into the next fiscal year.

Obviously the reason for the disappearance of the gender gap is that the remaining core of Bush's female supporters are motivated by his steely-eyed manliness, not by anything related to policies or competence. He'll only lose them if he starts making unfortunate wardrobe choices or develops a lisp.

It used to be I read the news and thought, "Oh, a scandal for the Bush admin, excellent - but on the other hand, it's also bad news for America, so that's not good." Then I read the news and was disgusted and frightened and outraged. Then I read the news and thought, "Oh well, at least it'll be clear to everyone that the Bush admin is a disaster, maybe they'll vote my way next time". Now I'm just bored.

This seems like an awfully expensive program. What if we all just mail in our phone bills every month to save them the trouble of spying. Yeah, then they can pick out the terrorists by those who don't send in the bills. Or maybe you can apply to be a certified non-terrorist, like the airport screening pass deal, and then they can skip monitoring you? There's got to be a cheaper way to deal with it. Outsource the spying to India, I don't know.

I am so frustrated with our government right now. What can we do?

Polls of the President are in the dumper yet republicans won't represent public outcry. I think we need extensive polls of Senators. So then, they might actually think twice about making sure they are representing their constituents.

PS- I printed out a full copy of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights and mailed it to the White House. I attached a note expressing my desire for the President to read some of the most elegant documents of mankind since it is apparent he has never done so.

HA! I got a chuckle from the lady who put on the postage stamp.

Heh, rilkefan's Four Stages of Dealing with Incompetent Administrations. I think I went through a similar cycle.

A Fun Site!

It is wonderful to witness hoe their are at least some deserving folks benefiting from the economy

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The average CEO of a Standard & Poor's 500 company made $11.75 million in total compensation in 2005, according to a preliminary analysis by The Corporate Library. And that's just their annual take. At a time when most working families are looking at shrinking retirement nest eggs, many CEOs also have negotiated golden retirements for themselves. Here are the biggest CEO pensions:

http://www.aflcio.org/corporatewatch/paywatch/

A Fun Site!

It is wonderful to witness some deserving folks benefiting from the economy!

----------------------------
The average CEO of a Standard & Poor's 500 company made $11.75 million in total compensation in 2005, according to a preliminary analysis by The Corporate Library. And that's just their annual take. At a time when most working families are looking at shrinking retirement nest eggs, many CEOs also have negotiated golden retirements for themselves. Here are the biggest CEO pensions:

http://www.aflcio.org/corporatewatch/paywatch/

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