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July 30, 2012

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I was deeply disappointed that they had Brunel but not Steampunk Lovelace and Babbage -- they fight crime! (and hurdy-gurdy men.)

"..., the retina has adhered and the gas is slowly being replaced by fluid, ..."

At some point, while looking straight down through the gas bubble, you should have a 2x - 3x magnifier that's great for reading tiny print.

"though in the US, efficiency is the key, and it's done on a overnight or an out patient basis."

Not just efficiency: People who stay too long in American hospitals have a deplorable tendency to contract antibiotic resistant infections, and die of them. They're trying to get people back out before this happens.

I'm not sure who 'they' is, but your assertion is ahistorical, cf this

Since 1980 the U.S. policy focus has centered on keeping people out of the hospital and keeping hospital stays as short as possible. As a result, U.S. hospital use has declined more rapidly than the OECD median: Between 1980 and 1996 the number of inpatient acute days per capita per year declined by an average of 3.3 percent in the United States and 2.7 percent in the median OECD country.17 In 1998 the average length of a hospital stay in the United States was 6.1 days, compared with the OECD median of 7.3 days; the number of admissions per 100,000 U.S. population was 12,492, compared with the OECD median of 13,800.

If you have a cite that shows evidence that it was specifically because of antibiotic-resistant strains rather than overall policy of cost reduction, I would like to see it, however, even if that was the stated purpose, it merely helped give rise to community based rather than facility based strains.

Admittedly, it's just anecdotal, a conversation with a doctor kicking mom out of the hospital amazingly early.

My colleagues in internal medicine tell me the pressure to discharge people early can be a problem, as Brett says. We haven't felt it so much in pediatrics, partly because we've always tried to get kids out as soon as possible. Of course children don't usually have the placement problems that elderly patients often have.

It is true hospitals can be dangerous places. Acquiring hospital-based infection is one of the dangers.

I wonder if the difference between your retinoplasty and mine is a matter of differences in training between the US and Japan, possibly related to different tollerances for lettig patients hanga round hosptials, or a difference in what went wrong with our retinas.

My eye doc told me my retina was rolling up like a window shade. They shot my eye full of gas but only after placing a plastic ring arounde my eye. (The ring is still there ).They would have sent me home the day of the surgery except I reacted badly to the anathesia.

So I did none of this layig around face down stuff I'd say your experience is worse than mine and you have all of my sympathy.

Yes, mine, too. Cataract surgery was a walk in the park by comparison.

On a Saturday about two years ago, I spotted a tear in the retina at the inside edge of vision in my left eye. Monday morning, I called a retina specialist clinic, told them what I though the problem was and made an appointment for that afternoon. The doctor took a look, agreed with my diagnosis and set up the operation for Friday morning. I was awake through the operation and walked out afterwards. At the post-op exam Saturday morning, the doctor said I should spend some time sleeping on my right side. From there, there was a number of follow-up exams and the two month wait—to the day—for the gas bubble to go away.

Charles, which eye was it?

Laura, that's a good point about the 'hopitalization cultures' and I'll probably post about it later. Would you mind if I lift up your comment as part of the post? thx

Sorry, Charles, just saw it was your left eye.

This all makes my panic over a few retinal tears about 8 months ago look rather trivial.

No I don't mind! Go ahead and use, it LJ.

I am stunned by Charles's comment that he ws awake during his operation.

There must be more than one way to repair a retina based on the nature of the problem. No way I was awak--they pulled my eyeball clear out of my head! They pulled it to the outside of my eyesocket in order to put the plastic ring around it. There isnn't a drug in the work that would have kept me calm thorugh that! They must have injected the gas inot Charles without pulling his eye out.

Panicking over retinal tears is not trivial. It is important to panic early and go straight to the doctor. I didn't go soon enough becaue I habitually talk myslef into thiking that thigs are o big deal. I didn't go until I saw blood drops the size of basketballs floating around in my vision.

Stop, for the love of God!

I'm waking up in the morning expecting Annie Sullivan to pull me out of bed and thrust my hand under the water flow from the pump.

Cripes!

I have a balky window shade in my place and every time I look at it now my eyes hurt and cloud over.

Last night I awakened screaming from a dream about Oedipus' mother chasing me up and down tilting hallways trying to poke my eyes out with her broach set.

The 450-lb chef in a bloody toque wielding poultry shears who was following her -- step-by-step-slowly-I-turned -- and screaming like Yoko doing the high-pitched stabbing sound effects from "Psycho" didn't appear to be on my side either, not that I stopped to ask.

Sometimes I dream that I've gone into the hospital to have both eyes operated on and I awake in the recovery room, look down (cause I can see ... "Eureka" .. that's the good news) and everything below the neck is missing.

The orderlies hustle to place my head on a gurney and drop kick me through the front door, while explaining that my procedure was of the out-patient variety to save Dick Armey (not a dick army, too!) money, and my poor head lands on a cobblestone street and I roll downhill, my screams dopplering through the city streets and I catch a glimpse of, what's that, San Francisco Bay, and I tell myself at least I can enjoy the view so the operation must have been successful, but shouldn't I be keeping very still, and just before I go plop and splash into the Bay, avedis steps out from the shrubbery and scoops my poor tumbling head up in a haberdashery box, puts it under his arm and sprints for the next cable-car alternately giggling manically like Peter Lorre and singing the Rice-A-Roni ditty over and over and over again .... and we end up in a gang shower full of really attractive lesbians on the USS Misogynist and they are soaping avedis' daughter's back with a gigantic Luffa, Loufa, whatever and she likes it, and well, a guy can be thankful for 20/20 vision, can't he?

So, lj, get well quickly for crying out loud and spare no expense.

The rest of you keep your heads very still and stop with the retinal tearing, please!

The tear in my retina was small and I could only see it by covering my right eye and looking about as far to the left as I could. The operation seem to be by-the-numbers and the surgeon and assistants spent more time commenting on the content of the radio program playing in the background than they did on the operation itself. The surgeon may have done a number of similar operations the same day he did mine.

How the opening ceremonies could have announced by Bob and Ray, from Roger Ebert.

http://blogs.suntimes.com/ebert/2012/07/oh_how_i_wish_you_could_hear_t.html

The Industrial Revolution, the National Health Service, Shakespeare's The Tempest, and the Sex Pistols.

Don't skip the comments, leading off with some paranoid delusion from a so-called American steeped in the malign nonsensical dogsh*te the far Right in this country passes off as curriculum for the stupid on their way to batsh*t.

I didn't actually mean you had to stop talking about it.

I just needed to cringe.

Carry on.

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