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September 05, 2010

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The link for The Periodic Table Of Swearing is no effing good.

Swearing link appears to be fixed now.

I hate most of those "the Periodic Table of ..."s, because they never do it right:

- about 92% of the atoms in the universe are hydrogen (Element 1, H, at the way upper right).

- about 8% of the atoms are helium (element 2, He)

- everything else is "misc".

Even if you divide it up by weight, H is about 74%, He is 23% ... and everything else is still "misc".

So at the very least, I expect whatever the Period Table version puts in the H place to be the most common example of whatever the table is listing. But they never do, and so I say, "Bah."

Life is imperfection.

I think you'd be a fine contributor here, by the way, Doctor Science.

I recently read an article that said honey as old as 3000 years was still good.

Would anyone like a USB typewriter?

They're getting hard to fix, to be sure.

Doctor Science: everything else is "misc".

Or, as astrophysicists would say, "metals."

They didn't used to do this sort of thing for the Hugos, he said in what's now more or less a non-sequitur. But what the heck.

Gary- that citation survey of Science papers is perhaps confounded by an unknown variable.

So at the very least, I expect whatever the Period Table version puts in the H place to be the most common example of whatever the table is listing. But they never do, and so I say, "Bah."

Or the simplest in structure. Or the first to form, chronologically. Or the lightest in mass per unit. Or the sole nonconforming member of an otherwise general group that's isomorphic to "alkali metals".

/smarta--

Since I said this was an open thread: this Kristof piece is quite good.

And: American Muslims Ask, Will We Ever Belong?.

Welcome back, Gary! Good links all around. The stuff on how we personalize machines is the most amazing though. I mean, before I read it I would have said duh, I knew that ... but the details made me sit back and realize what a bunch of strange monkeys we really are.

Slarti stole my post. I wanted to be a smarta-- too.
The fact that hydrogen is the most common element is at most tangetial to the reason why it is first in the Periodic Table.
If the universe was significantly older it probably wouldn't be most common anyway - eventually iron would probably be.

"eventually iron would be."

Or honey.

nope, definately iron.

Speaking of how we personalize machines, and mediate ourselves through them, this was quite interesting, I thought: The Boss Is Robotic, and Rolling Up Behind You.

Yay Foglios! Yay Girl Genius! Heterodynes 4ever!

(Element 1, H, at the way upper right).

Failing to win the fight against the urge to quibble, I have to ask: isn't it the upper left?

As to the structure, since it is orderly in a way that's tied to the filling of electron shells, a good take-off would be orderly in some similar way that would be cleverly depicted by the same layout. And how many things like that are there in the world, really? Certainly not condiments....

So I guess I would echo the "bah," if for not quite the same reason. ;)

*****

Since it's an open thread and a holiday, here was the view from halfway up the firetower at Mt. Pisgah in Winthrop, Maine, this morning. It was fun to get into the woods, no matter how much my knees complained.

view from Mt. Pisgah firetower

Full Hugo voter breakdowns, if anyone happens to enjoy analyzing the trends, and knows the interest groups well enough. :-)

So did no one at least like either the "Periodic Table Of Visualization Methods" or Crispian Jago's London Underground map of scientists?

Lovely view, Janie.

isn't it the upper left?

Not from the table's perspective.

a good take-off would be orderly in some similar way that would be cleverly depicted by the same layout.

There are probably more blog commenters who should never be allowed to form covalent bonds than there are noble gases, so that's one way it breaks down.

isn't it the upper left?

Not from the table's perspective.

The quibbling mind isn't a creative mind; it didn't occur to me that the table had a perspective. No doubt this is because of cognitive bias, or maybe political bias, or why not both? Who am I, after all, to pass judgment on tables?

;)

Back on politics, I'm still digesting this, but I'm sure some will be talking about the big Marianne Gingrich interview, and story behind it.

Many thanks for linking to my London Underground style science map. As luck would have it, I also have a periodic table to add to your collection:

http://crispian-jago.blogspot.com/2010/07/periodic-table-of-irrational-nonsense.html

Gary's mention of font design roused me to a little web searching and led to the very interesting Journal of the Association of Legal Writing Directors.

The connection is an article in the current issue is about typography in legal briefs. Yet more interesting is Was Colonel Sanders a Terrorist? An Essay on the Ethical Limits of Applied Legal Storytelling.

I decided this was worth sharing.

I'm more worried about the Colonel's allegiances to the Burger King, who if not a terrorist, is at the very least a stalker of Wendy and the one to watch our for.

It's a couple of posts too late (and I rarely comment unless I've had a few), but allow me to say: Welcome back Gary.

Hope you're well.

They didn't have some nice methods for visualization- such as the heat map, though I guess the county/color map might be of that genre. It was pretty cool.

I've got nothing interesting to say about either of your posts, Gary, but I'm glad to see you posting. I hope it becomes a regular thing.

JanieM,

No doubt this is because of cognitive bias, or maybe political bias, or why not both? Who am I, after all, to pass judgment on tables?

A fanatical tableist (or maybe anti-tableist?) is who you are, and you shouldn't be allowed in polite company.

It turns out many of us may have wrong ideas about how to study information.

Donald, I was hoping to do one more post for today, on some labor history/issues, but it didn't work out that way. So it goes.

I think the example with the painters is a bit misleading. If one wants to distinguish between the painters it is imo only useful to see their pictures at the same time, so one can do direct comparisions (epecially, if their styles are similar). I would say the same about music btw. To do it in sequence ('old approach') doesn't make sense to me.

I would also like to extend a hearty "welcome back", Gary. Hope you're doing progressively better. Or at least liberally better. :)

Also, since you linked to the Hugo awards: I am irrationally proud of Seanan for winning Best New Author. I don't know her all that well, but she and Jess (my other half) are good friends, so I had her book Feed rather emphatically shoved at me. To my delight, it was fantastic--probably the best zombie novel I've read, and definitely a great read on its own merits, particularly if you are interested in the evolution of blogs and social media. And I get a good giggle whenever I read about "Congresswoman Wagman", who is superficially based on Jess--a number of characters in the book are named after or based on Seanan's friends and online acquaintances.

The book has a great website too.

That's great to hear about Seanan, Catsy.

I'm so mediocre at being in touch with the field that I hadn't heard of her until her nomination and win.

But I make no pretense of keeping up with who is new, and it isn't unusual for me to still just be noticing folks who have been published for a decade or so, at this point.

Jeffrey Goldberg has a pretty big scoop after Fidel Castro asks him to come down for a chat.

Gary,

He certainly is in full campaign mode now. And it is what he is best at.

The alleged science of sexy dance moves.

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