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April 27, 2009

Comments

I don't want to sound unduly harsh, but the last half-dozen epidemics have been exaggerated out of all proportion for political or economic (mainly quack remedy-selling) reasons. We should not be so quick to fall for such things, despite the number who have allegedly died. There is as yet no evidence that this is a new Spanish flu. It just happens to be at the United States's door.

Thats a good point. We'll have lots of time to think about preparation and prevention when we're all dead. Obama and the Mexican government just needed to create a crisis because they had nothing else going on. I wish someone would take on the Vitamin C lobby, its all i hear about this week.

Sorry, I don't think these are useful reactions.

Proper reactions are caution and wariness, not panic or dismissal. Given the rocky nature of US health care (particularly among the poor and underinsured) and the hits to it made by anti-vaccers, there's a fair amount of potential for a disaster to occur, particularly if there's complacency.

MFB: Look at the actual recommendations. They are all good ones, they are not hysterical or odd, and they are all things you can do without much trouble.

Oh, I should mention, the wonder of the Internet is that you can keep tabs on developments yourself (and given its nature, events change rapidly). I'd suggest Effects Measure or Aetiology to help you keep an eye out.

Wrt 'Preparing for the possibility of staying in your home', the Making Light blog has several times run its helpful checklist for flu prep.

The checklist is useful for a number of possible emergencies, and pieces of it can be implemented in stages. So worth a look even if -- especially if -- the risk is not high or imminent.

"Obama and the Mexican government just needed to create a crisis because they had nothing else going on."

Huh!?!

Bolds mine, should they survive typepad.

I'm with hilzoy et al, there's nothing in the advice given here that is alarmist or extreme. The only thing remotely out of the ordinary is the recommendation to prepare for being asked to stay home.

I'd call this a sane, measured heads up. Thanks for it, hilzoy.

The flu kit link is a stored one, but just now checking, I see that there's a fairly comprehensive front-page post at Making Light on the subject.

I have to admit I find the idea of having enough food and, especially, water in the house for a month to be kind of daunting. Sure, there's maybe 30 gallons in the hot water tank, but getting another 30-60 gallons is hard. 55-gallon drums don't grow on trees.

I think it is stunning the amount of drivel that people will read on Twitter and the like. I'm keeping up with legitimate news sources here: www.virusrecovery.net

-jay

Do you need that much water? I live near a river, which i wouldn't want to drink out of, but i have a gallon of bleach which i think would be enough to get by for a while (disinfecting the water, i mean. not going out punk rock.) I don't have it, but a month's worth of peanut butter wouldn't be too expensive.

I don't want to sound unduly harsh, but the last half-dozen epidemics have been exaggerated out of all proportion for political or economic (mainly quack remedy-selling) reasons. We should not be so quick to fall for such things

Quite right. We're always hearing these warnings of incipient disaster unless we take precautions, we dutifully take precautions, and no disaster happens. Funny how that works . . .

"Thats a good point. We'll have lots of time to think about preparation and prevention when we're all dead."

Don't know why, yoyo, but that made me bust a gut.

@Nathan Williams:

The extra water can be stored five (or two) gallons at a time; it needn't be in one large container.

Good Post. In this times, we must be vigilant enough to know whats going on about the fast rising rate of swine flu. But no worries, these disease can be cured, with the proper procedures.

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