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September 07, 2007

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Wait, by this logic, doesn't this mean that the best reaction to 9/11 would have been to deny that it ever happened at all?

There is a related article called The Myth of AQI in the new Washington Monthly which will make your jaw drop. It turns out that AQI is only responsible for somewhere between 1 and 8.5 % of all the Iraqi violence, consists of only around 850 people and that consequently most of the Anbar-Sheikhs-switching-sides-to-fight-AQI phenomenon is basically a PR stunt.

If the standard of success is no car bombings or suicide bombings, we have just handed those who commit suicide bombings a huge victory.

You don't need to see his identification.
These aren't the droids you're looking for.
He can go about his business.
Move along.

McMartin,

It might well have been. After all, the financial impact of the attack was rather minor in terms of actual property losses. The damage was done by the psychological reaction. The military answer has been rather too large and has probably crippled US economy worse than accepting a few 9/11's a year in a stoical manner would have done.

Or again, the Times of the nineteenth of December had published the official forecasts of the output of various classes of consumption goods in the fourth quarter of 1983, which was also the sixth quarter of the Ninth Three-Year Plan. Today's issue contained a statement of the actual output, from which it appeared that the forecasts were in every instance grossly wrong. Winston's job was to rectify the original figures by making them agree with the later ones.

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Whatnot


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