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April 07, 2005

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» Remembering a Hero from SIVACRACY.NET: Siva Vaidhyanathan's Weblog
Go to Obsidian Wings and read about Mbaye Diagne.... [Read More]

» Mbaye Diagne from Malice Aforethought
Mbaye Diagne and what he did deserve to be better known. I don't even know how to pronounce that name, but the man who bore it was a hero. The web never forgets, so link to the post if you have a blog, that history might do him adequate honour. (Still ... [Read More]

» Mbaye Diagne from Malice Aforethought
Mbaye Diagne and what he did deserve to be better known. I don't even know how to pronounce that name, but the man who bore it was a hero. The web never forgets, so link to the post if you have a blog, that history might do him honour. (Still hiatusing... [Read More]

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Comments

I nearly cried, watching "Ghosts of Rwanda", in no small part due to Mbaye Diagne's story. Such a powerfully heroic man, and he died such a senseless death.

Thanks for posting this.

I'd never heard this story before; thank you for sharing it with us.

I'd heard a story about his courage on NPR but your entry is very moving. Thanks for posting it.

Let me join the chorus of thanks, hilzoy. I might not have heard this story otherwise and (even though I'm tearing up) I'm glad I did. Such a hero deserves to be remembered.

Wow, a true hero. I too never heard of this man until now.

Thanks Hilzoy.

What a beautiful story of humanity, despite the sad ending.

There is a quote from Platos Laws in the book I'm currently reading,

"Men will live according to nature since in most respects they are puppets, yet having a small part in the truth"

This man at least showed us that not all men are puppets.


What a beautiful story of humanity, despite the sad ending.

There is a quote from Platos Laws in the book I'm currently reading,

"Men will live according to nature since in most respects they are puppets, yet having a small part in the truth"

This man at least showed us that not all men are puppets.


I remember reading about him a while back. A true hero, in a day when that term is greatly overused. One question, though, should I ever want to discuss this outside of the blogosphere: how does one pronounce his name?

Larv: Mbay (rhymes with 'high', although if you can manage an almost undetectable lapse before the 'ee' at the end kicks in, so that there's a fleeting moment of 'a', that's best. And no stop between m and b.)

Jan/jang (the real pronunciation of the last bit in French would be: n with a little bit of y (the consonant, not the vowel) after, but when I've heard his name pronounced on TV it's closer to 'jang', though with the 'ng' part not, as it were, very ng.) There's also a hint of the i in the last name: transcribing it as 'jiang' would tempt one to pronounce it as two syllables ('jee-ang'), which is why I didn't, but it is definitely there if you listen.

This piece has made my day. Thank you for pointing out someone who with the grace of some light in a soul, with the power and will of conviction makes a mark in this life one life along the way after another.

Less facetiously than in the other thread, words fail me. I fully intend to reflect on his life and thereby better my own. Thanks.

Thanks, Hilzoy.

I just linked to this here

Thanks again. Any other words fail me.

Thanks for sharing and consider it linked!

Just a little tip: go see "Hotel Rwanda" aswell!

"my government"

This was the U.S. government under Bill Clinton, yes?

I saw his story in "Ghosts of Rwanda". And what can I say?
Captain Mbaye Diagne was incredible. He should be remembered.

Thanks, Hilzoy.

Thanks, Hilzoy.

Thanks, Hilzoy.

I just finished watching Ghosts of Rwanda & unlike the first poster I did cry. I do not recall ever having such a tough time watching film than watching this documentary. If it wasn't for the courage shown of the men & women who stayed back I don't think I would have recovered any sense of hope in humanity & I mean that sincerely because it really affected me. Mbaye Diagne is one of those humans who truly inspire this hope. How the U.N & the Clinton adminstration & all those officials who turned their backs on this African genocide can sleep is beyond me.

i have been personally offended by our counties intentional ignoring this horrrific crime, but the story of Mbaye gives me hope and impressed me so much that i chose to share his story in my christian sunday school class

Diagne Mbaye exemplifies the bravery, courage, and endurance of himself and the UN forces in Rwanda. May his memory be a service to all peacekeepers everywhere in providing safety and keeping the peace in many parts around the world.

My heart goes to his family and LGen. Romeo Dallaire. I feel a lot of shame that our country, the United States did not provide assistance or aid until after the crimes occurred and the genocide was over. US may be a big country, but we are definitely lacking heart when it comes to humanitarian aid around the world.

There are no words. In 2006, Paul Rusesabagina came to speak at my school. I had been pretty ignorant of what happened in Rwanda up to that point. I'm ashamed of that. I'm ashamed, enraged by what the world did not do. As Paul Wilkins says in Ghosts of Rwanda, "What we have to realize, is that in each of us is a capacity for evil, and a capacity for good."

I've been reading a lot about Rwanda since, I also like the book, "Left to Tell" by Immaculée Ilibagiza. Her stories, and stories like the work Desmond Tutu did in South Africa make hope that the power of good can win, and that compassion and forgiveness (though not condoning) can overcome the capacity for evil, which in some cases I think can completely, and irrevocably take over a person until there is no humanity left in them. Of course the capacity for evil and the capacity of indifference and inaction often have the same result in the end. I don't think I can ever look at Bill Clinton in the same way after learning how he acted in this situation. There is no excuse... none, except personal greed.

Your anger at people who did nothing, at people how let evil and fear envelope them then threaten to overwhelm you, and that's how the cycle starts all over again.

Then, in rare miracles, there are people and stories like Captain Mbaye, which I hadn't heard of until Ghost of Rwanda. They restore my faith in faith in the capacity for good, in the capacity for humanity, in really, God.

If Captain Mbaye had to leave us, we can be thankful that his life gives us hope and faith to carry on and to believe in the good of people.

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